Guidebook to Enchanting North Bali

Teck

Guidebook to Enchanting North Bali

Hiking
Mount Batur is one of two active volcanoes on Bali and sunrise treks are offered. The climb is best to do at sunrise, so it does require you to wake up at an ungodly hour and be up at the peak of the mountain before sunrise. It’s worth it though! What to to bring to the trek? A hat – any simple snapback would do. This comes in handy during descent as the sun in Bali gets very strong even before 8 am. Sunscreen – again, the sun in Bali gets very strong even in the early morning so you still have to protect your skin! Sunglasses – again, for sun protection. Good pair of shoes – Trekking shoes would be ideal since there is some loose gravel nearing the summit, but that said, I did wear my regular Nike running shoes and was fine… for the most part. I only fell once 😛 Insect Repellent – there are some pesky mosquitoes on the trail! A Light Windbreaker – Going up the trail wasn’t an issue since you probably will be sweating and warm from all the cardio. But it can get chilly later at the summit while you are waiting for sunrise. Exploring the Mount Batur Caldera After the sunrise, you will continue on to explore the rest of the caldera. Mount Batur is still an active volcano, with the most recent eruption in 2000. Made informed us that during the 1968 eruption of Mount Batur, red lava flowed into the caldera and to this day the black lava field can still be seen from the summit. On a clear day, you can see Mount Agung from the summit which makes for an amazing picture. And because you start so early, you’re basically done climbing a volcano by 9 am! Some people are not even awake yet!
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Baturvulkanen
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Mount Batur is one of two active volcanoes on Bali and sunrise treks are offered. The climb is best to do at sunrise, so it does require you to wake up at an ungodly hour and be up at the peak of the mountain before sunrise. It’s worth it though! What to to bring to the trek? A hat – any simple snapback would do. This comes in handy during descent as the sun in Bali gets very strong even before 8 am. Sunscreen – again, the sun in Bali gets very strong even in the early morning so you still have to protect your skin! Sunglasses – again, for sun protection. Good pair of shoes – Trekking shoes would be ideal since there is some loose gravel nearing the summit, but that said, I did wear my regular Nike running shoes and was fine… for the most part. I only fell once 😛 Insect Repellent – there are some pesky mosquitoes on the trail! A Light Windbreaker – Going up the trail wasn’t an issue since you probably will be sweating and warm from all the cardio. But it can get chilly later at the summit while you are waiting for sunrise. Exploring the Mount Batur Caldera After the sunrise, you will continue on to explore the rest of the caldera. Mount Batur is still an active volcano, with the most recent eruption in 2000. Made informed us that during the 1968 eruption of Mount Batur, red lava flowed into the caldera and to this day the black lava field can still be seen from the summit. On a clear day, you can see Mount Agung from the summit which makes for an amazing picture. And because you start so early, you’re basically done climbing a volcano by 9 am! Some people are not even awake yet!
As you drive from Ulun Danu to Gitgit, you will drive through a beautiful stretch of road surrounded by greenery on all sides. You have to walk up a steep flight of stairs for about 15 minutes before you reach the base of the waterfalls. Serene sight with clean water, you can easily relax here for an hour.
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Gitgit Waterfall
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As you drive from Ulun Danu to Gitgit, you will drive through a beautiful stretch of road surrounded by greenery on all sides. You have to walk up a steep flight of stairs for about 15 minutes before you reach the base of the waterfalls. Serene sight with clean water, you can easily relax here for an hour.
A layer of mist hangs in the air, shrouding the magnificent twin-falls, which drop 80m to the valley floor below. Deep-green forests cling the the hills as trees crane towards the sky in search of sunlight. It’s like a scene from Avatar, only this is real life. There are three entrance fees to Sekumpul waterfall - view only, medium trekking and long trekking. Due to recently passed regulations, these fees have increased substantially over the last few months. These regulations insist that each visitor to Sekumpul waterfall is now required to hire a guide for the duration of their visit. This is in part to for visitor safety, but also to support the local economy, maintain infrastructure, and respect local customs. While the fee may be quite expensive, we think it’s a good measure as it will help maintain the beauty of Sekumpul, as well as support the local economy in general. Upon arrival, you’ll need to pay the entry fee, at which point you’ll be handed over to your guide to start the trek down to the falls. VIEW ONLY The 'view only’ fee is IDR 20,000 per person and allows viewing of Sekumpul waterfall only. MEDIUM TREKKING The 'medium trekking' option for Sekumpul waterfall is IDR 125,000 per person. This includes a guide, donation to the local village, and visiting both Sekumpul and Hidden waterfalls. This is the option we recommend. LONG TREKKING The ‘long trekking’ option to Sekumpul costs IDR 200,000 per person and includes a guide, donation to the local village, and visiting both Sekumpul and Hidden waterfalls, as well as the triple-falls of Fiji waterfall, which is a short hike away. There’s also an inclusion of bottled water - please refuse this and bring your own re-usable water bottle - there’s enough plastic in Bali. THE HIKE TO SEKUMPUL WATERFALL The hike down to Sekumpul waterfall is rather steep and arduous, but it’s absolutely worth it for the incredible views. Starting in the car park, the hike winds through a number of small villages before arriving at Sekumpul’s main viewpoint, which provides a stunning view of the falls from above. We recommend taking a few photos from here before following the stairs down to the base of the falls. Arriving to the valley floor, your guide will take you a short distance to Hidden waterfall, an ‘Avatar’ like environment where greenery hugs the surrounding rocks and water falls from just about every angle. It’s a completely surreal environment. From Hidden waterfall, the hike takes you through the rushing creek before arriving at the base of Sekumpul waterfall. The view of the towering waterfall from above will make you feel incredibly small. You’ll likely get soaked to bits here, but it’s all part of the fun. After admiring the incredible surrounds, you’ll begin the 30 - 40min hike back to the carpark. Following what feels like a never-ending pathway of steps, this is probably the toughest part of the trek. Allow for around 3-4 hours to explore the area properly. IGNORE THE ‘REGISTRATION’ POINTS ALONG THE WAY On the road towards Sekumpul waterfall, you may encounter a number of ‘registration’ points, that read “Sekumpul registration”. Ignore these. These ‘registration points’ are nothing more than a scam to get unaware tourists to pay ‘registration fees’ to visit the waterfall, or to join their hiking tour, which is apparently the only way to visit the falls. It isn’t. Make your way past these 'registration points' until you reach the official Sekumpul waterfall car park, located here. SEKUMPUL WATERFALL IS VERY SLIPPERY IN WET SEASON, SO PACK PROPER FOOTWEAR There are some incredible photos you can get from the base of Sekumpul waterfall, however during wet season the area is extremely slippery. Be careful when traversing the area as one small slip could end up in a decent injury. We recommend packing suitable footwear that has decent grip. IT’S QUITE EXPENSIVE TO ENTER SEKUMPUL WATERFALL As we mentioned above, the falls can be quite expensive to enter. Due to recently passed regulations, the cost to enter has increased to support the local economy, maintain infrastructure, and respect local customs. The entry fee also includes a guide who will keep you safe! YOU’LL HAVE A GUIDE Entry fees to Sekumpul waterfall also include a local guide. Our guide, Kadek, was a local who’d worked in the tourism industry around the world, but returned to Bali to build a life in his own village. He was extremely knowledgeable and patient (we took forever taking photos!), and manages his local chapter of ‘Trash Heroes’, helping keep the area rubbish free while educating his local community on the ills of plastic pollution. In other words, Kadek was a legend.
Sekumpul Waterfall
A layer of mist hangs in the air, shrouding the magnificent twin-falls, which drop 80m to the valley floor below. Deep-green forests cling the the hills as trees crane towards the sky in search of sunlight. It’s like a scene from Avatar, only this is real life. There are three entrance fees to Sekumpul waterfall - view only, medium trekking and long trekking. Due to recently passed regulations, these fees have increased substantially over the last few months. These regulations insist that each visitor to Sekumpul waterfall is now required to hire a guide for the duration of their visit. This is in part to for visitor safety, but also to support the local economy, maintain infrastructure, and respect local customs. While the fee may be quite expensive, we think it’s a good measure as it will help maintain the beauty of Sekumpul, as well as support the local economy in general. Upon arrival, you’ll need to pay the entry fee, at which point you’ll be handed over to your guide to start the trek down to the falls. VIEW ONLY The 'view only’ fee is IDR 20,000 per person and allows viewing of Sekumpul waterfall only. MEDIUM TREKKING The 'medium trekking' option for Sekumpul waterfall is IDR 125,000 per person. This includes a guide, donation to the local village, and visiting both Sekumpul and Hidden waterfalls. This is the option we recommend. LONG TREKKING The ‘long trekking’ option to Sekumpul costs IDR 200,000 per person and includes a guide, donation to the local village, and visiting both Sekumpul and Hidden waterfalls, as well as the triple-falls of Fiji waterfall, which is a short hike away. There’s also an inclusion of bottled water - please refuse this and bring your own re-usable water bottle - there’s enough plastic in Bali. THE HIKE TO SEKUMPUL WATERFALL The hike down to Sekumpul waterfall is rather steep and arduous, but it’s absolutely worth it for the incredible views. Starting in the car park, the hike winds through a number of small villages before arriving at Sekumpul’s main viewpoint, which provides a stunning view of the falls from above. We recommend taking a few photos from here before following the stairs down to the base of the falls. Arriving to the valley floor, your guide will take you a short distance to Hidden waterfall, an ‘Avatar’ like environment where greenery hugs the surrounding rocks and water falls from just about every angle. It’s a completely surreal environment. From Hidden waterfall, the hike takes you through the rushing creek before arriving at the base of Sekumpul waterfall. The view of the towering waterfall from above will make you feel incredibly small. You’ll likely get soaked to bits here, but it’s all part of the fun. After admiring the incredible surrounds, you’ll begin the 30 - 40min hike back to the carpark. Following what feels like a never-ending pathway of steps, this is probably the toughest part of the trek. Allow for around 3-4 hours to explore the area properly. IGNORE THE ‘REGISTRATION’ POINTS ALONG THE WAY On the road towards Sekumpul waterfall, you may encounter a number of ‘registration’ points, that read “Sekumpul registration”. Ignore these. These ‘registration points’ are nothing more than a scam to get unaware tourists to pay ‘registration fees’ to visit the waterfall, or to join their hiking tour, which is apparently the only way to visit the falls. It isn’t. Make your way past these 'registration points' until you reach the official Sekumpul waterfall car park, located here. SEKUMPUL WATERFALL IS VERY SLIPPERY IN WET SEASON, SO PACK PROPER FOOTWEAR There are some incredible photos you can get from the base of Sekumpul waterfall, however during wet season the area is extremely slippery. Be careful when traversing the area as one small slip could end up in a decent injury. We recommend packing suitable footwear that has decent grip. IT’S QUITE EXPENSIVE TO ENTER SEKUMPUL WATERFALL As we mentioned above, the falls can be quite expensive to enter. Due to recently passed regulations, the cost to enter has increased to support the local economy, maintain infrastructure, and respect local customs. The entry fee also includes a guide who will keep you safe! YOU’LL HAVE A GUIDE Entry fees to Sekumpul waterfall also include a local guide. Our guide, Kadek, was a local who’d worked in the tourism industry around the world, but returned to Bali to build a life in his own village. He was extremely knowledgeable and patient (we took forever taking photos!), and manages his local chapter of ‘Trash Heroes’, helping keep the area rubbish free while educating his local community on the ills of plastic pollution. In other words, Kadek was a legend.
West Bali National Park (Indonesian: Taman Nasional Bali Barat) is a national park located in Buleleng Regency, Bali, Indonesia. The park covers around 190 square kilometres (73 sq mi), of which are 158 square kilometres (61 sq mi) land and the remainder is sea. This is approximately 3% of Bali's total land area. To the north, it includes a 1,000-metre (3,300 ft) long beach, reef and islets. A seaport at Gilimanuk is west of the park, and the village of Goris is to the east. The National Park can be reached by roads from Gilimanuk and Singaraja, or by using ferries from Ketapang, East Java. There are several habitats in the national park, a savanna, mangroves, montane and mixed-monsoon forests, and coral islands.[3] The center of the park is dominated by remnants of four volcanic mountains from Pleistocene era, with Gunung Patas at 1,412 metres (4,633 ft) its highest elevation.
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West Bali National Park
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West Bali National Park (Indonesian: Taman Nasional Bali Barat) is a national park located in Buleleng Regency, Bali, Indonesia. The park covers around 190 square kilometres (73 sq mi), of which are 158 square kilometres (61 sq mi) land and the remainder is sea. This is approximately 3% of Bali's total land area. To the north, it includes a 1,000-metre (3,300 ft) long beach, reef and islets. A seaport at Gilimanuk is west of the park, and the village of Goris is to the east. The National Park can be reached by roads from Gilimanuk and Singaraja, or by using ferries from Ketapang, East Java. There are several habitats in the national park, a savanna, mangroves, montane and mixed-monsoon forests, and coral islands.[3] The center of the park is dominated by remnants of four volcanic mountains from Pleistocene era, with Gunung Patas at 1,412 metres (4,633 ft) its highest elevation.
Sightseeing
BALI AGA - TENGANAN PERGRINGSINGAN & MAKARE-KARE (PANDANUS WAR) Tenganan Pegringsingan or Pageringsingan is a village in the regency of Karangasem in East Bali, Indonesia. Before the 1970s, it was known by anthropologists to be a secluded society in the archipelago. Rapid changes have occurred in the village since the 1970s, such as the development of local communications by the central government, the opening up to tourism, the breaking of its endogamic rules. Tourists are attracted to Tenganan by its unique Bali Aga culture that still holds to the original traditions, ceremonies and rules of ancient Balinese, and its unique village layout and architecture. It is known for its Gambelan selonding music played on iron metalophones and its "geringsing" double ikat textiles, which are woven in only 3 places in the world. HISTORICAL LEGEND According to legend, the people of Tenganan Pegringsingan were selected by the Hindu god of storms and warfare, Indra, to administer a territory that was conceived in accordance with his divine plan to be a microcosm of the world. They were instructed to use every means to keep it pure and clean. The concept of territorial, bodily and spiritual purity and integrity is of paramount importance in the village. Another variation of this legend is of the magical horse Uccaisrawa, of King Udayana, ruler of the 11th century kingdom of Bedahulu. The horse was to be sacrificed but escaped. The king was distraught and sent search parties out to find him. A group of trusted servants, men from the Peneges family were assigned to search the eastern area of the island in the area of Karangasem. The king had promised a huge reward to whoever found Uccaisrawa, however when they did find him, he had died of exhaustion. The king rewarded the finders with the land for as far as the smell of the dead horse could be detected. The men of Peneges dismembered the horse and carried the parts to various places around the place where the horse had died. Unknown to the king's men, the Peneges men had hidden portions of dead horse into their clothes, so the rotten smell followed them everywhere until the king's men decided it was enough land and left. The Peneges men brought their families to the place called ngetengahang which means "to move to the middle", a valley now known as Tenganan Pegringsingan. It also is named after the double ikat geringsing cloth that Indra taught the women to weave. It sparkled with star motifs that emulated his divine realm. THE PEOPLE OF TENGANAN PERGRINGSINGAN The people of Tenganan Pegringsingan are called Bali Aga—the original Balinese. They descend from the pre-Majapahit kingdom of Bedahulu. There are strict rules as to who is allowed to live in the village. Only those born in the village can stay in the village and become full members of the community. There are rules regarding marriage and anyone who marries outside of the village has to leave. A strict protocol regarding marriages among the kin groups have steered the Tengananese through the genetic perils of intermarriage although with increasing contact with the outside world these rules have relaxed somewhat. The Bali Aga, Baliaga or Bali Mula are the indigenous people of Bali, predominantly located in the eastern part of the island, in Karangasem. They can also be found in north-western and central regions. Bali Aga people that are referred to as Bali Pergunungan (Mountain Balinese) are those that are located at Trunyan village. For the Trunyan Bali Aga people, the term Bali Aga (Mountain Balinese) is regarded as an insult with an additional meaning of "the mountain people that are fools"; therefore, they prefer the term Bali Mula (lit Original Balinese) instead. RITES AND RITUALS Many of the life-cycle rituals of the Tengananese are similar to those of the Balinese in general, but have subtle differences. Some ceremonies are unique. One of the distinguishing features is the use of geringsing or double ikat cloth. By virtue of their magical qualities geringsing are not only capable of keeping impurities and danger out of the village, but also shield and protect humans from harmful influences during rites of passage as they transition from one phase of life to the next. Another Tenganan attraction is the ritual tradition Mekare-kare, also known as "Pandan War". (https://www.thejakartapost.com/life/2018/08/16/makare-kare-a-gladiator-style-ritual-in-tenganan-village.html) Mekare-kare is the top part of the procession of the ceremony that's held at Ngusaba Sambah each June and lasts for 30 days. For one month, Mekare-kare is done 2-4 times and each time, gifts are given to the village's ancestors. The men are involved with Mekare-kare from the time they are young, right through until old age. As the name implies, it uses pandan leaves, cut into pieces of around 30 cm length, that can be used as a weap and a shield to fend off opponents. At the conclusion of the battle, their bloody wounds were treated with a traditional potion made of turmeric, vinegar, cucumber and antiseptic.
Tenganan Pegeringsingan Village
BALI AGA - TENGANAN PERGRINGSINGAN & MAKARE-KARE (PANDANUS WAR) Tenganan Pegringsingan or Pageringsingan is a village in the regency of Karangasem in East Bali, Indonesia. Before the 1970s, it was known by anthropologists to be a secluded society in the archipelago. Rapid changes have occurred in the village since the 1970s, such as the development of local communications by the central government, the opening up to tourism, the breaking of its endogamic rules. Tourists are attracted to Tenganan by its unique Bali Aga culture that still holds to the original traditions, ceremonies and rules of ancient Balinese, and its unique village layout and architecture. It is known for its Gambelan selonding music played on iron metalophones and its "geringsing" double ikat textiles, which are woven in only 3 places in the world. HISTORICAL LEGEND According to legend, the people of Tenganan Pegringsingan were selected by the Hindu god of storms and warfare, Indra, to administer a territory that was conceived in accordance with his divine plan to be a microcosm of the world. They were instructed to use every means to keep it pure and clean. The concept of territorial, bodily and spiritual purity and integrity is of paramount importance in the village. Another variation of this legend is of the magical horse Uccaisrawa, of King Udayana, ruler of the 11th century kingdom of Bedahulu. The horse was to be sacrificed but escaped. The king was distraught and sent search parties out to find him. A group of trusted servants, men from the Peneges family were assigned to search the eastern area of the island in the area of Karangasem. The king had promised a huge reward to whoever found Uccaisrawa, however when they did find him, he had died of exhaustion. The king rewarded the finders with the land for as far as the smell of the dead horse could be detected. The men of Peneges dismembered the horse and carried the parts to various places around the place where the horse had died. Unknown to the king's men, the Peneges men had hidden portions of dead horse into their clothes, so the rotten smell followed them everywhere until the king's men decided it was enough land and left. The Peneges men brought their families to the place called ngetengahang which means "to move to the middle", a valley now known as Tenganan Pegringsingan. It also is named after the double ikat geringsing cloth that Indra taught the women to weave. It sparkled with star motifs that emulated his divine realm. THE PEOPLE OF TENGANAN PERGRINGSINGAN The people of Tenganan Pegringsingan are called Bali Aga—the original Balinese. They descend from the pre-Majapahit kingdom of Bedahulu. There are strict rules as to who is allowed to live in the village. Only those born in the village can stay in the village and become full members of the community. There are rules regarding marriage and anyone who marries outside of the village has to leave. A strict protocol regarding marriages among the kin groups have steered the Tengananese through the genetic perils of intermarriage although with increasing contact with the outside world these rules have relaxed somewhat. The Bali Aga, Baliaga or Bali Mula are the indigenous people of Bali, predominantly located in the eastern part of the island, in Karangasem. They can also be found in north-western and central regions. Bali Aga people that are referred to as Bali Pergunungan (Mountain Balinese) are those that are located at Trunyan village. For the Trunyan Bali Aga people, the term Bali Aga (Mountain Balinese) is regarded as an insult with an additional meaning of "the mountain people that are fools"; therefore, they prefer the term Bali Mula (lit Original Balinese) instead. RITES AND RITUALS Many of the life-cycle rituals of the Tengananese are similar to those of the Balinese in general, but have subtle differences. Some ceremonies are unique. One of the distinguishing features is the use of geringsing or double ikat cloth. By virtue of their magical qualities geringsing are not only capable of keeping impurities and danger out of the village, but also shield and protect humans from harmful influences during rites of passage as they transition from one phase of life to the next. Another Tenganan attraction is the ritual tradition Mekare-kare, also known as "Pandan War". (https://www.thejakartapost.com/life/2018/08/16/makare-kare-a-gladiator-style-ritual-in-tenganan-village.html) Mekare-kare is the top part of the procession of the ceremony that's held at Ngusaba Sambah each June and lasts for 30 days. For one month, Mekare-kare is done 2-4 times and each time, gifts are given to the village's ancestors. The men are involved with Mekare-kare from the time they are young, right through until old age. As the name implies, it uses pandan leaves, cut into pieces of around 30 cm length, that can be used as a weap and a shield to fend off opponents. At the conclusion of the battle, their bloody wounds were treated with a traditional potion made of turmeric, vinegar, cucumber and antiseptic.
Lovina, located in North Bali, is a quiet resort town with an 8-km beach. It is famous for black sand and dolphin watching tours that have become one of the main attractions of the area. Dolphin pods in Lovina were often followed by fishing boats, leading local fishermen to sardines and mackerels. Now the fishermen make money showing their sea friends to tourists.
Lovina Dolphin PORT
Lovina, located in North Bali, is a quiet resort town with an 8-km beach. It is famous for black sand and dolphin watching tours that have become one of the main attractions of the area. Dolphin pods in Lovina were often followed by fishing boats, leading local fishermen to sardines and mackerels. Now the fishermen make money showing their sea friends to tourists.
Pura Ulun Danu Beratan is a major Hindu Shiva temple in Bali, Indonesia. The temple complex is on the shores of Lake Bratan in the mountains near Bedugul. The water from the lake serves the entire region in the outflow area; downstream there are many smaller water temples that are specific to each irrigation association, or subak. Built in 1633, the temple is used for offerings and ceremonies dedicated to the Balinese water, lake and river goddess Dewi Danu, due to the importance of Lake Bratan as a main source of irrigation in central Bali. The 11-storey pelinggih meru in the complex is dedicated to Shiva and his consort Parvathi. Buddha's statue is also enshrined in this temple. This temple is also called the "Bali temple on the Lake" because it looks as if it is floating when the Bratan River rises. The Buddhist stupa of Beratan is a place of worship for Buddhists located at the tourist complex of Pura Ulun Danu Beratan. Its existence is quite unique and interesting considering its location in close proximity to the sites of worship belonging to Hindus. This stupa signifies religious harmony. It faces south and is located outside the main area of the Ulun Danu Beratan Temple complex. In Bali, Hindu temples are known as "pura", are designed as open-air places of worship within walled compounds. The compound walls have a series of intricately decorated gates without doors for the devotee to enter. The design and plan of the holy pura follows a square layout. A typical temple is laid out according to ancient Lontar texts with three courtyards separated by low walls pierced by ornate gateways. The outer courtyard is for secular pursuits, with pavilions used for meetings, resting performers and musicians at festivals. Food stalls are set up here during festivals. The middle courtyard is a transition zone between the human and divine sections; here offerings are prepared and temple paraphernalia are stored. The inner courtyard is the site of the shrines and religious ceremonies. The shrines are known as merus and are square structures with brick bases and multiple pagoda-style thatched roofs; the number of roofs reflects the status of the deity, and is always an odd number. Pura Ulun Danu Beratan is one of the nine 'Kahyangan Jagat' temples on Bali. The temple complex consists of five various shrines dedicated to other Hindu gods as well.
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Ulun Danu Beratan Temple
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Pura Ulun Danu Beratan is a major Hindu Shiva temple in Bali, Indonesia. The temple complex is on the shores of Lake Bratan in the mountains near Bedugul. The water from the lake serves the entire region in the outflow area; downstream there are many smaller water temples that are specific to each irrigation association, or subak. Built in 1633, the temple is used for offerings and ceremonies dedicated to the Balinese water, lake and river goddess Dewi Danu, due to the importance of Lake Bratan as a main source of irrigation in central Bali. The 11-storey pelinggih meru in the complex is dedicated to Shiva and his consort Parvathi. Buddha's statue is also enshrined in this temple. This temple is also called the "Bali temple on the Lake" because it looks as if it is floating when the Bratan River rises. The Buddhist stupa of Beratan is a place of worship for Buddhists located at the tourist complex of Pura Ulun Danu Beratan. Its existence is quite unique and interesting considering its location in close proximity to the sites of worship belonging to Hindus. This stupa signifies religious harmony. It faces south and is located outside the main area of the Ulun Danu Beratan Temple complex. In Bali, Hindu temples are known as "pura", are designed as open-air places of worship within walled compounds. The compound walls have a series of intricately decorated gates without doors for the devotee to enter. The design and plan of the holy pura follows a square layout. A typical temple is laid out according to ancient Lontar texts with three courtyards separated by low walls pierced by ornate gateways. The outer courtyard is for secular pursuits, with pavilions used for meetings, resting performers and musicians at festivals. Food stalls are set up here during festivals. The middle courtyard is a transition zone between the human and divine sections; here offerings are prepared and temple paraphernalia are stored. The inner courtyard is the site of the shrines and religious ceremonies. The shrines are known as merus and are square structures with brick bases and multiple pagoda-style thatched roofs; the number of roofs reflects the status of the deity, and is always an odd number. Pura Ulun Danu Beratan is one of the nine 'Kahyangan Jagat' temples on Bali. The temple complex consists of five various shrines dedicated to other Hindu gods as well.
Lake Tamblingan (Indonesian: Danau Tamblingan) is a caldera lake located in Buleleng Regency, Bali. It is commonly referred to as one of the Twin Lakes, as it is situated side by side with another lake, Buyan. The lake is located at the foot of Mount Lesung in Munduk administrative village, Banjar subdistrict, Buleleng Regency, Bali, Indonesia. The lake is also one of the three lakes that were formed inside an ancient caldera; the other lakes being situated to the east of Lake Tamblingan -- Lake Buyan and Lake Bratan. Tamblingan Lake is a pristine lake surrounded with dense rainforest and archaeological remnants of the 10th-century Tamblingan civilization. The lake and the surrounding settlements is designated as a spiritual tourism area protected from modern development by the government. Lake Tamblingan is surrounded with many ancient Balinese temples (puras). The many temples surrounding the lake is associated with the ancient Tamblingan civilization. Tamblingan is first mentioned in a 900s CE copper inscription as a settlement located on the southern shore of Tamblingan Lake. This copper inscriptions was discovered in the village of Gobleg, another ancient village located near Munduk. The ancient temple Pura Dalem Tamblingan is still maintained today, located on the southern shore of Lake Tamblingan in what is now a small village of Gubug. Due to an unknown reason, the people from the original Tamblingan village migrated to four different places in the vicinity of the lake, creating new villages collectively known as Catur Desa ("four villages"). These villages are Munduk, Gobleg, Gesing, and Umejero. The four villages shared similar spiritual belief, that is to maintain the sanctity of the lake Tamblingan. Temples were established along the lake Tamblingan to honor the gods.
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Lake Tamblingan
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Lake Tamblingan (Indonesian: Danau Tamblingan) is a caldera lake located in Buleleng Regency, Bali. It is commonly referred to as one of the Twin Lakes, as it is situated side by side with another lake, Buyan. The lake is located at the foot of Mount Lesung in Munduk administrative village, Banjar subdistrict, Buleleng Regency, Bali, Indonesia. The lake is also one of the three lakes that were formed inside an ancient caldera; the other lakes being situated to the east of Lake Tamblingan -- Lake Buyan and Lake Bratan. Tamblingan Lake is a pristine lake surrounded with dense rainforest and archaeological remnants of the 10th-century Tamblingan civilization. The lake and the surrounding settlements is designated as a spiritual tourism area protected from modern development by the government. Lake Tamblingan is surrounded with many ancient Balinese temples (puras). The many temples surrounding the lake is associated with the ancient Tamblingan civilization. Tamblingan is first mentioned in a 900s CE copper inscription as a settlement located on the southern shore of Tamblingan Lake. This copper inscriptions was discovered in the village of Gobleg, another ancient village located near Munduk. The ancient temple Pura Dalem Tamblingan is still maintained today, located on the southern shore of Lake Tamblingan in what is now a small village of Gubug. Due to an unknown reason, the people from the original Tamblingan village migrated to four different places in the vicinity of the lake, creating new villages collectively known as Catur Desa ("four villages"). These villages are Munduk, Gobleg, Gesing, and Umejero. The four villages shared similar spiritual belief, that is to maintain the sanctity of the lake Tamblingan. Temples were established along the lake Tamblingan to honor the gods.
Buyan is a beautiful lake in Wanagiri village in Buleleng regency. It is commonly referred to as one of the Twin Lakes, as it is situated side by side with another lake, Tamblingan. Lake Buyan is about 3.9 Km wide, and its deepest point is about 87 metres. Visit to enjoy its beautiful views and cool mountain breeze.
Lake Buyan
Buyan is a beautiful lake in Wanagiri village in Buleleng regency. It is commonly referred to as one of the Twin Lakes, as it is situated side by side with another lake, Tamblingan. Lake Buyan is about 3.9 Km wide, and its deepest point is about 87 metres. Visit to enjoy its beautiful views and cool mountain breeze.
Lake Batur is a volcanic crater lake in Kintamani, Bali, Bangli Regency of Bali, located about 30 km (19 mi) northeast of Ubud in Bali. The lake is inside the caldera of an active volcano, Mount Batur, located along the Ring of Fire of volcanic activity.
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Danau Batur
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Lake Batur is a volcanic crater lake in Kintamani, Bali, Bangli Regency of Bali, located about 30 km (19 mi) northeast of Ubud in Bali. The lake is inside the caldera of an active volcano, Mount Batur, located along the Ring of Fire of volcanic activity.
The Jatiluwih rice terraces in the namesake upland village in West Bali are most famous for their dramatic and exotic landscapes. The cool highlands and the breathtaking scenery of this village at the foot of Mount Batukaru makes for wonderful photo opportunities, and serves as a soothing retreat away from the island’s crowded south. A UNESCO Cultural Heritage Site, the Jatiluwih rice terraces comprise over 600 hectares of rice fields that follow the flowing topography of the Batukaru mountain range. These are maintained by a traditional water management cooperative known as subak, which dates back to the 9th century. The cooperative itself eventually won recognition as a dominant factor in Bali’s ‘cultural landscape’ entry on the UNESCO heritage list (https://whc.unesco.org/en/list/1194/). The subak reflects the Balinese philosophical concept of Tri Hita Karana, which brings together the realms of the spirit, the human world and nature. This philosophy was born of the cultural exchange between Bali and India over the past 2,000 years and has shaped the landscape of Bali. The subak system of democratic and egalitarian farming practices has enabled the Balinese to become the most prolific rice growers in the archipelago despite the challenge of supporting a dense population. Because of its beauty, Jatiluwih was visited by President Barack Obama in July 2017, during his holiday trip in Bali.
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Jatiluwih Rice Terraces
Desa Jalan Jatiluwih No
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The Jatiluwih rice terraces in the namesake upland village in West Bali are most famous for their dramatic and exotic landscapes. The cool highlands and the breathtaking scenery of this village at the foot of Mount Batukaru makes for wonderful photo opportunities, and serves as a soothing retreat away from the island’s crowded south. A UNESCO Cultural Heritage Site, the Jatiluwih rice terraces comprise over 600 hectares of rice fields that follow the flowing topography of the Batukaru mountain range. These are maintained by a traditional water management cooperative known as subak, which dates back to the 9th century. The cooperative itself eventually won recognition as a dominant factor in Bali’s ‘cultural landscape’ entry on the UNESCO heritage list (https://whc.unesco.org/en/list/1194/). The subak reflects the Balinese philosophical concept of Tri Hita Karana, which brings together the realms of the spirit, the human world and nature. This philosophy was born of the cultural exchange between Bali and India over the past 2,000 years and has shaped the landscape of Bali. The subak system of democratic and egalitarian farming practices has enabled the Balinese to become the most prolific rice growers in the archipelago despite the challenge of supporting a dense population. Because of its beauty, Jatiluwih was visited by President Barack Obama in July 2017, during his holiday trip in Bali.
Banjar Hot Springs, locally referred to as ‘Air Panas Banjar’, are located approximately 5km southwest from the famous Lovina coast in North Bali. The hot water springs share the same water source as the Brahmavihara Arama Buddhist monastery which is located only 1.5 km to the east. The centuries-old hot springs have been upgraded with modern facilities over time, and have become a favourite retreat and recreational site among locals and international visitors. The hot water springs provide a recreational and therapeutic experience, due to the water’s sulphuric content. This can be seen from the yellowish red sedimentation at several points of the spouts and pool walls. The complex is known to have been further developed during the Japanese occupation of Indonesia during World War II. At the time, the water of the hot springs was known to have cured various skin problems as well as rheumatic ailments. Banjar Holy Hot Springs has a sulfur content of 26% and a temperature of ± 38 ° C which is perfect for healing (healing process). There are three main pools: 1. Swimming pool with a depth of 2 meters; 2. Children's pool with a depth of 1 meter and is suitable for bathing; and 3. "Shower pool" this pool is a legacy of the Japanese government and has 3 pieces of shower heads that are perfect for a natural massage.
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Air Panas Banjar Hot Spring
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Banjar Hot Springs, locally referred to as ‘Air Panas Banjar’, are located approximately 5km southwest from the famous Lovina coast in North Bali. The hot water springs share the same water source as the Brahmavihara Arama Buddhist monastery which is located only 1.5 km to the east. The centuries-old hot springs have been upgraded with modern facilities over time, and have become a favourite retreat and recreational site among locals and international visitors. The hot water springs provide a recreational and therapeutic experience, due to the water’s sulphuric content. This can be seen from the yellowish red sedimentation at several points of the spouts and pool walls. The complex is known to have been further developed during the Japanese occupation of Indonesia during World War II. At the time, the water of the hot springs was known to have cured various skin problems as well as rheumatic ailments. Banjar Holy Hot Springs has a sulfur content of 26% and a temperature of ± 38 ° C which is perfect for healing (healing process). There are three main pools: 1. Swimming pool with a depth of 2 meters; 2. Children's pool with a depth of 1 meter and is suitable for bathing; and 3. "Shower pool" this pool is a legacy of the Japanese government and has 3 pieces of shower heads that are perfect for a natural massage.
This 1.2-hectare former royal water palace serves as a fascinating reminder of the old Bali. Built for the last raja of Karangasem in 1946, it was almost fully destroyed by the eruption of nearby Gunung Agung in 1963, but has subsequently been rebuilt. Admire the 11-tiered Nawa Sanga fountain and the ponds filled with huge koi and lotus blossoms, and jump between the round stepping stones in the water. It's also possible to take a swim in the huge stone spring-water pool. Named after the sacred river Ganges in Hinduism, Tirta Gangga is noted for the Karangasem royal water palace, bathing pools and its Patirthan temple. The one hectare complex was built in 1946 by the late King of Karangsem but was destroyed almost entirely by the eruption of nearby Mount Agung in 1963. Tirta Gangga is based on the beliefs in Balinese Hinduism, where river Ganges and its waters are considered sacred. Its waters are cherished for irrigation and agricultural abundance, recreation and economic activity. The Patirthan temple illustrates the historic significance of Tirta Gangga in the Balinese tradition as a pilgrimage and holy water site.
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Tirta Gangga
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This 1.2-hectare former royal water palace serves as a fascinating reminder of the old Bali. Built for the last raja of Karangasem in 1946, it was almost fully destroyed by the eruption of nearby Gunung Agung in 1963, but has subsequently been rebuilt. Admire the 11-tiered Nawa Sanga fountain and the ponds filled with huge koi and lotus blossoms, and jump between the round stepping stones in the water. It's also possible to take a swim in the huge stone spring-water pool. Named after the sacred river Ganges in Hinduism, Tirta Gangga is noted for the Karangasem royal water palace, bathing pools and its Patirthan temple. The one hectare complex was built in 1946 by the late King of Karangsem but was destroyed almost entirely by the eruption of nearby Mount Agung in 1963. Tirta Gangga is based on the beliefs in Balinese Hinduism, where river Ganges and its waters are considered sacred. Its waters are cherished for irrigation and agricultural abundance, recreation and economic activity. The Patirthan temple illustrates the historic significance of Tirta Gangga in the Balinese tradition as a pilgrimage and holy water site.
Perched nearly 1000m up the side of Gunung Agung, this is Bali's most important Hindu temple. The site encompasses 23 separate but related temples, with the largest and most important being Pura Penataran Agung, built on six levels terraced up the slope. It has an imposing candi bentar (split gateway); note that tourists are not allowed inside. The Pura Besakih complex hosts frequent ceremonies, but the recent eruptions of the volcano have kept both worshipper and visitor numbers down. The precise origins of the temple complex are not totally clear, but it almost certainly dates from prehistoric times. The stone bases of Pura Penataran Agung and several other temples resemble megalithic stepped pyramids and date back at least 2000 years. It was certainly used as a Hindu place of worship from 1284, when the first Javanese conquerors settled in Bali. By the 15th century Besakih had become a state temple of the Gelgel dynasty. When you reach the site there are two parking areas: Parkir Bawa and Parking Atas. The former is the main parking area and the first you'll encounter coming from the south; all tourists must park here. There is a ticket office close by. Sarongs and sashes are available next to the office, and must be worn; rental is included in your ticket. Many visitors bring their own.
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Besakih Temple
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Perched nearly 1000m up the side of Gunung Agung, this is Bali's most important Hindu temple. The site encompasses 23 separate but related temples, with the largest and most important being Pura Penataran Agung, built on six levels terraced up the slope. It has an imposing candi bentar (split gateway); note that tourists are not allowed inside. The Pura Besakih complex hosts frequent ceremonies, but the recent eruptions of the volcano have kept both worshipper and visitor numbers down. The precise origins of the temple complex are not totally clear, but it almost certainly dates from prehistoric times. The stone bases of Pura Penataran Agung and several other temples resemble megalithic stepped pyramids and date back at least 2000 years. It was certainly used as a Hindu place of worship from 1284, when the first Javanese conquerors settled in Bali. By the 15th century Besakih had become a state temple of the Gelgel dynasty. When you reach the site there are two parking areas: Parkir Bawa and Parking Atas. The former is the main parking area and the first you'll encounter coming from the south; all tourists must park here. There is a ticket office close by. Sarongs and sashes are available next to the office, and must be worn; rental is included in your ticket. Many visitors bring their own.
Telaga Waja river, located at the District of Rendang, Karangasem Regency in eastern Bali, is second in length amongst rivers in Bali, after the Ayung River. The water comes from several springs in the mountains near Mount Agung, the highest mountain in Bali and considered holy by Hindu native people. The white-water rafting level in this river is at Level 3 - 4 and offers extreme rafting with beautiful scenery of the rain forest, rice terrace, stone cliffs and water falls.
Telaga Waja River Rafting Bali
Telaga Waja river, located at the District of Rendang, Karangasem Regency in eastern Bali, is second in length amongst rivers in Bali, after the Ayung River. The water comes from several springs in the mountains near Mount Agung, the highest mountain in Bali and considered holy by Hindu native people. The white-water rafting level in this river is at Level 3 - 4 and offers extreme rafting with beautiful scenery of the rain forest, rice terrace, stone cliffs and water falls.
Toya Devasya Hot Spring Waterpark features eight natural hot spring pools and one warm Olympic-sized pool. Heated deep within the earth, minerals from the colorless and odorless hot spring brings healing and curative powers. Take a relaxing dip after an adventurous day of hiking, canoeing or cycling to ease your sore muscles. Or just for a simple getaway to enjoy the majestic panorama.
Toya Devasya
Toya Devasya Hot Spring Waterpark features eight natural hot spring pools and one warm Olympic-sized pool. Heated deep within the earth, minerals from the colorless and odorless hot spring brings healing and curative powers. Take a relaxing dip after an adventurous day of hiking, canoeing or cycling to ease your sore muscles. Or just for a simple getaway to enjoy the majestic panorama.
Diving
USAT Liberty was a United States Army cargo ship torpedoed by Japanese submarine I-166 in January 1942 and beached on the island of Bali, Indonesia. She had been built as a Design 1037 ship for the United States Shipping Board in World War I and had served in the United States Navy in that war as animal transport USS Liberty (ID-3461). She was also notable as the first ship constructed at Federal Shipbuilding, Kearny, New Jersey. In 1963 a volcanic eruption moved the ship off the beach, and Liberty's wreck is now a popular dive site. Liberty′s wreck rests in about 30 metres (100 ft) of water off Tulamben, Bali, Indonesia. The highest point of the wreck is at a depth of about 5 metres (16 ft) and the lowest point sits at about 30 metres (100 ft).The wreck is a great display of how nature creates life everywhere and great coral formations can be observed on the wreck′s guns.
Tulamben US Liberty Wreck Ship
USAT Liberty was a United States Army cargo ship torpedoed by Japanese submarine I-166 in January 1942 and beached on the island of Bali, Indonesia. She had been built as a Design 1037 ship for the United States Shipping Board in World War I and had served in the United States Navy in that war as animal transport USS Liberty (ID-3461). She was also notable as the first ship constructed at Federal Shipbuilding, Kearny, New Jersey. In 1963 a volcanic eruption moved the ship off the beach, and Liberty's wreck is now a popular dive site. Liberty′s wreck rests in about 30 metres (100 ft) of water off Tulamben, Bali, Indonesia. The highest point of the wreck is at a depth of about 5 metres (16 ft) and the lowest point sits at about 30 metres (100 ft).The wreck is a great display of how nature creates life everywhere and great coral formations can be observed on the wreck′s guns.
The Japanese Wreck dive site in Amed is a 20 meters sunken wreck of a Japanese patrol ship sunk during the World War II. The wreck is lively with colorful soft corals all over it and lies in at a depth varying between 2-12 meters. If you follow the descending slope, you get to a nice coral plateau at a depth of 35 meters. It lays on silty sand that can easily be stirred up by too many divers or a change in the prevailing currents. But overall the wreck itself is a very easy and safe dive. The wreck now sports a fine array of large gorgonian fans, sponges and general marine life. With the area around the stern particularly vibrant. Diving the Japanese Wreck in Bali is very easy. The hardest part being the entry and exit on the black pebbles of the beach at Banyuning Bay. Which, if there is swell, can be a bit challenging. But once in the water, it’s a short surface swim to the buoy marking the wreck. The wreck itself is fairly small and looks like it used to be a tug. But it is quite hard to tell now that it is on its side and partially broken up. While the Japanese wreck may play second fiddle to the very well-known Liberty wreck in nearby Tulamben, this quite small and interesting wreck really deserves your attention if you are diving around Amed. The wreck is literally just off the beach in Banyuning Bay close to the small village of the same name on the eastern tip of Bali. Banyuning is just one of the seven villages along the 8km long strip of coastline that is referred to as “Amed”. And to further confuse matters, one of those seven villages is also called Amed. So, there is Amed the area and… Amed the village in the Amed area!
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Japanese Ship Wreck Point
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The Japanese Wreck dive site in Amed is a 20 meters sunken wreck of a Japanese patrol ship sunk during the World War II. The wreck is lively with colorful soft corals all over it and lies in at a depth varying between 2-12 meters. If you follow the descending slope, you get to a nice coral plateau at a depth of 35 meters. It lays on silty sand that can easily be stirred up by too many divers or a change in the prevailing currents. But overall the wreck itself is a very easy and safe dive. The wreck now sports a fine array of large gorgonian fans, sponges and general marine life. With the area around the stern particularly vibrant. Diving the Japanese Wreck in Bali is very easy. The hardest part being the entry and exit on the black pebbles of the beach at Banyuning Bay. Which, if there is swell, can be a bit challenging. But once in the water, it’s a short surface swim to the buoy marking the wreck. The wreck itself is fairly small and looks like it used to be a tug. But it is quite hard to tell now that it is on its side and partially broken up. While the Japanese wreck may play second fiddle to the very well-known Liberty wreck in nearby Tulamben, this quite small and interesting wreck really deserves your attention if you are diving around Amed. The wreck is literally just off the beach in Banyuning Bay close to the small village of the same name on the eastern tip of Bali. Banyuning is just one of the seven villages along the 8km long strip of coastline that is referred to as “Amed”. And to further confuse matters, one of those seven villages is also called Amed. So, there is Amed the area and… Amed the village in the Amed area!
Around Air Sanih
Sights and Places of Interest near Villa Kembang Sepatu
Pura Dalem Jagaraga was built in 1181 or around the 12th century, and it isn’t an ordinary temple in Bali. This temple is witness to the Balinese people’s struggle against their Dutch invaders. Dutch troops initially succeeded in occupying the temple around 1848, but it didn’t last long. At the time, the residents of Singaraja resisted, led by Patih I Gusti Ketut Jelantik, resulting in the Jagaraga War. Unfortunately, 2,700 Balinese fighters were killed in this war. Meanwhile 400 Dutch troops, including their commissioned officers, lost their lives. After the death of their commissioned officers, this temple once again became the property of Balinese people. Jagaraga itself means "guard yourself". Former fighters often came to people's houses while shouting "Jaga raga ... jaga raga" to guard themselves from the colonialist attacks. Jaga raga then became a slogan. It does not only symbolize the spirit of the Balinese people who fought against the colonialism, but the village also changed its name from Sukha Pura to Jagaraga. Pura Dalam Jagaraga is an ancient temple which is also the palace of Lord Shiva. The temple building only consists of two Mandalas (https://www.wikiwand.com/en/Balinese_architecture) and its walls are decorated with a variety of unique carvings that tell a story about the life of Balinese people before being colonized by the Dutch. The story then continues, from the life of the Dutch colonizers who lived arbitrarily in Bali, until the events of the Jagaraga War. In addition, there are also carvings that depict the story of Balinese mythology, Rangda, which is an evil wizard in Balinese society.
Pura Dalem Jagaraga Temple
Pura Dalem Jagaraga was built in 1181 or around the 12th century, and it isn’t an ordinary temple in Bali. This temple is witness to the Balinese people’s struggle against their Dutch invaders. Dutch troops initially succeeded in occupying the temple around 1848, but it didn’t last long. At the time, the residents of Singaraja resisted, led by Patih I Gusti Ketut Jelantik, resulting in the Jagaraga War. Unfortunately, 2,700 Balinese fighters were killed in this war. Meanwhile 400 Dutch troops, including their commissioned officers, lost their lives. After the death of their commissioned officers, this temple once again became the property of Balinese people. Jagaraga itself means "guard yourself". Former fighters often came to people's houses while shouting "Jaga raga ... jaga raga" to guard themselves from the colonialist attacks. Jaga raga then became a slogan. It does not only symbolize the spirit of the Balinese people who fought against the colonialism, but the village also changed its name from Sukha Pura to Jagaraga. Pura Dalam Jagaraga is an ancient temple which is also the palace of Lord Shiva. The temple building only consists of two Mandalas (https://www.wikiwand.com/en/Balinese_architecture) and its walls are decorated with a variety of unique carvings that tell a story about the life of Balinese people before being colonized by the Dutch. The story then continues, from the life of the Dutch colonizers who lived arbitrarily in Bali, until the events of the Jagaraga War. In addition, there are also carvings that depict the story of Balinese mythology, Rangda, which is an evil wizard in Balinese society.
Air Sanih is a natural pool whose water comes from a groundwater source traced to Lake Batur that is located more than 100 kilometers from Air Sanih. Since 1930, this swimming pool has become a local mainstay amongst recreational places visited by tourists, both local and foreign, in Buleleng Regency. The pool is adjacent to the beach, so you get to enjoy the vast expansive views of the ocean in front of you, while swimming. The water for the pool originates from the south of the adult pool, at the bottom of Kamboja Tree near the temple for Lord Vishnu. There is a story about why the groundwater source comes from Batur Lake. There was a grandfather who took off a few ducks in Batur Lake, then one of the ducks released. But strangely, a few days later the duck appeared of the fountain in the pool of Air Sanih. From then on, people around the swimming pool of Air Sanih confident that the source of water in the pool came from lake water in the lake Batur. Air Sanih has two swimming pools. The first one is for adult with the depth around 1,5 meters. And the second one is for children with depth are until adult thighs. Besides of that, there is a long small pool that flaw around Sanih area.
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Kolam Renang Air Sanih
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Air Sanih is a natural pool whose water comes from a groundwater source traced to Lake Batur that is located more than 100 kilometers from Air Sanih. Since 1930, this swimming pool has become a local mainstay amongst recreational places visited by tourists, both local and foreign, in Buleleng Regency. The pool is adjacent to the beach, so you get to enjoy the vast expansive views of the ocean in front of you, while swimming. The water for the pool originates from the south of the adult pool, at the bottom of Kamboja Tree near the temple for Lord Vishnu. There is a story about why the groundwater source comes from Batur Lake. There was a grandfather who took off a few ducks in Batur Lake, then one of the ducks released. But strangely, a few days later the duck appeared of the fountain in the pool of Air Sanih. From then on, people around the swimming pool of Air Sanih confident that the source of water in the pool came from lake water in the lake Batur. Air Sanih has two swimming pools. The first one is for adult with the depth around 1,5 meters. And the second one is for children with depth are until adult thighs. Besides of that, there is a long small pool that flaw around Sanih area.

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Pura Dalem Jagaraga
This small historic temple, built in 1181 AD, is less than 20 minutes from the villa. Please refer to its entry in this guidebook, under Sightseeing.