Erin’s guidebook

Erin
Erin’s guidebook

Food scene

Apparently in no particular order, these are some of the restaurants in (and relatively close to) Littleton that anyone visiting should check out.
Local Landmark—1973 Carnegie Library 1920 The Carnegie Library at the west end of Main Street, c.1920. The first Littleton Public Library was opened in 1897 in a drugstore on Main Street. As it grew it was moved from place to place; by 1903 it was located "in comfortable rooms facing the street upstairs...[in the] town hall." This town hall was the structure built by L. Evans in 1889 at 2450 West Main Street. Littleton had purchased the building in 1898 for city offices and added a brick extension to its front in 1902. They temporarily rented some of the new space to Arapahoe County officials and also moved the public library into the second floor of this brick addition. (In 1920 the brick town hall was replaced on the same site at 2450 West Main with the terra cotta faced Italian Renaissance Town Hall designed by Jacques Benedict.) In the mid-teens a movement was begun to get support from the Carnegie Foundation for a new library. The location was narrowed down to two sites: the corner of Prince and Malinda (now Alamo) streets, or the west end of Main Street. One requirement for Carnegie support was that a local tax must be imposed to maintain the library. That vote passed in April 1915, and the Main Street site was selected in August. $500 was quickly raised by popular subscription to purchase the site from the Water Company. Some citizens, however, were still apprehensive about the financial control wielded by the Carnegie Foundation over the project. As it turned out, not only was its control financial, but the Foundation's secretary stringently applied its (or his) rules for the library design. The local government was expected to select the architect and act as his client. A library board appointed by Mayor J. E. Maloney chose Jacques Jules Benois Benedict who had designed many outstanding homes and other buildings in the area, including Denver's Woodbury Branch Library. Benedict had been educated at the Beaux-Arts School of Architecture in Paris and was known for his period architecture and fine attention to detail. Eccentric and exacting, he soon clashed with the Foundation's secretary. Plans were repeatedly sent in and returned until they were finally approved and funds of $8,000 were released for the new building in July 1916. The new library opened 31 August 1917 under the auspices of The Woman's Club. Carnegie Library Building 2015 Carnegie Library facade, 2015. Photo by Amelia Martinez. The Beaux-Arts movement, a style employed frequently by Carnegie institutions, influenced the building's design. In the case of Littleton's Carnegie Library, the buff brick building has an Italian Renaissance style with large Palladian style windows dominating the façade. Columns with Ionic capitols border the large, divided light windows and the entryway. At the apex of each arch is a keystone. Decorative brick panels below each window help balance the façade by giving the illusion that the entrance and the windows are of the same size. The eave of the tile hipped roof projects forward to protect a decorative frieze. The ceiling of the arched entryway is ornamented in a terracotta flower motif. Ornamental terracotta printer seals decorate the entrance below the cornice. It has been said that, despite its small size, it carries the large arches with delicacy and balance. The contractors were V. W. Robbins and the Watts Brothers. Carnegie Library Building Door 2015 Carnegie Library entrance, 2015. Photo by Amelia Martinez. The Carnegie Library was a center of community activities for several decades. During the Depression it housed a Colorado Works Administration project to give women work in binding books. A Federal Employment Relief Association project provided maintenance and new furniture. During World War II, it housed a Red Cross service project and allowed a "Bundles for Britain" festival there. The Littleton Public Library had completely outgrown the Carnegie building by 1965, when it moved to 6014 South Datura Street. The Carnegie building was given landmark status by Littleton in 1973. With two exceptions, the exterior of the Carnegie building is largely unchanged since its construction, but the interior has had many different uses since the library relocated. Until 1977 it was the Littleton police station and jail. In early 1979 the city sold it to a developer who remodeled the inside and opened a discotheque called "Pistachio's." It was then that additions were made to the south and west sides of the building. The concrete-block extension on the south side obliterated an arched window which was part of the original brick building. The disco was followed by four restaurants: Cafe Kandahar, with an Alpine ski motif and European cuisine, Alpine Cafe for family dining, The Old Library, a beer garden, and Scribbles, owned by two members of the Denver Broncos football team. In 1997 it became The Melting Pot, a fondue restaurant, and the restaurant continues to be a popular local dining spot in 2017. At 100 years, the Carnegie Library, although somewhat altered, still graces the foot of Littleton's Main Street.
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The Melting Pot
2707 West Main Street
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Local Landmark—1973 Carnegie Library 1920 The Carnegie Library at the west end of Main Street, c.1920. The first Littleton Public Library was opened in 1897 in a drugstore on Main Street. As it grew it was moved from place to place; by 1903 it was located "in comfortable rooms facing the street upstairs...[in the] town hall." This town hall was the structure built by L. Evans in 1889 at 2450 West Main Street. Littleton had purchased the building in 1898 for city offices and added a brick extension to its front in 1902. They temporarily rented some of the new space to Arapahoe County officials and also moved the public library into the second floor of this brick addition. (In 1920 the brick town hall was replaced on the same site at 2450 West Main with the terra cotta faced Italian Renaissance Town Hall designed by Jacques Benedict.) In the mid-teens a movement was begun to get support from the Carnegie Foundation for a new library. The location was narrowed down to two sites: the corner of Prince and Malinda (now Alamo) streets, or the west end of Main Street. One requirement for Carnegie support was that a local tax must be imposed to maintain the library. That vote passed in April 1915, and the Main Street site was selected in August. $500 was quickly raised by popular subscription to purchase the site from the Water Company. Some citizens, however, were still apprehensive about the financial control wielded by the Carnegie Foundation over the project. As it turned out, not only was its control financial, but the Foundation's secretary stringently applied its (or his) rules for the library design. The local government was expected to select the architect and act as his client. A library board appointed by Mayor J. E. Maloney chose Jacques Jules Benois Benedict who had designed many outstanding homes and other buildings in the area, including Denver's Woodbury Branch Library. Benedict had been educated at the Beaux-Arts School of Architecture in Paris and was known for his period architecture and fine attention to detail. Eccentric and exacting, he soon clashed with the Foundation's secretary. Plans were repeatedly sent in and returned until they were finally approved and funds of $8,000 were released for the new building in July 1916. The new library opened 31 August 1917 under the auspices of The Woman's Club. Carnegie Library Building 2015 Carnegie Library facade, 2015. Photo by Amelia Martinez. The Beaux-Arts movement, a style employed frequently by Carnegie institutions, influenced the building's design. In the case of Littleton's Carnegie Library, the buff brick building has an Italian Renaissance style with large Palladian style windows dominating the façade. Columns with Ionic capitols border the large, divided light windows and the entryway. At the apex of each arch is a keystone. Decorative brick panels below each window help balance the façade by giving the illusion that the entrance and the windows are of the same size. The eave of the tile hipped roof projects forward to protect a decorative frieze. The ceiling of the arched entryway is ornamented in a terracotta flower motif. Ornamental terracotta printer seals decorate the entrance below the cornice. It has been said that, despite its small size, it carries the large arches with delicacy and balance. The contractors were V. W. Robbins and the Watts Brothers. Carnegie Library Building Door 2015 Carnegie Library entrance, 2015. Photo by Amelia Martinez. The Carnegie Library was a center of community activities for several decades. During the Depression it housed a Colorado Works Administration project to give women work in binding books. A Federal Employment Relief Association project provided maintenance and new furniture. During World War II, it housed a Red Cross service project and allowed a "Bundles for Britain" festival there. The Littleton Public Library had completely outgrown the Carnegie building by 1965, when it moved to 6014 South Datura Street. The Carnegie building was given landmark status by Littleton in 1973. With two exceptions, the exterior of the Carnegie building is largely unchanged since its construction, but the interior has had many different uses since the library relocated. Until 1977 it was the Littleton police station and jail. In early 1979 the city sold it to a developer who remodeled the inside and opened a discotheque called "Pistachio's." It was then that additions were made to the south and west sides of the building. The concrete-block extension on the south side obliterated an arched window which was part of the original brick building. The disco was followed by four restaurants: Cafe Kandahar, with an Alpine ski motif and European cuisine, Alpine Cafe for family dining, The Old Library, a beer garden, and Scribbles, owned by two members of the Denver Broncos football team. In 1997 it became The Melting Pot, a fondue restaurant, and the restaurant continues to be a popular local dining spot in 2017. At 100 years, the Carnegie Library, although somewhat altered, still graces the foot of Littleton's Main Street.
A food truck in an alley with other stuff to do I guess. Hipsters rave about it.
The Alley
2420 W Main St
A food truck in an alley with other stuff to do I guess. Hipsters rave about it.
Mexican restaurant in downtown Littleton. People rave about it but it's only so-so as far as I'm concerned.
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Palenque Cocina Y Agaveria
2609 W Main St
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Mexican restaurant in downtown Littleton. People rave about it but it's only so-so as far as I'm concerned.
https://thefort.com/ $$$$ https://www.tesoroculturalcenter.org/ Great atmosphere and food. Dog the Bounty Hunter (another Colorado treasure), Beth and their family eat there - I stood next to them waiting to be seated at our tables last year. They're much taller on TV. Trust me. The fort is also home to the Tesuro Center, which is dedicated to the preservation of the Southwest’s rich cultural art and history. They put on Pow-wows and rendezvous throughout the year and definitely worth checking out!
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The Fort
19192 Colorado 8
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https://thefort.com/ $$$$ https://www.tesoroculturalcenter.org/ Great atmosphere and food. Dog the Bounty Hunter (another Colorado treasure), Beth and their family eat there - I stood next to them waiting to be seated at our tables last year. They're much taller on TV. Trust me. The fort is also home to the Tesuro Center, which is dedicated to the preservation of the Southwest’s rich cultural art and history. They put on Pow-wows and rendezvous throughout the year and definitely worth checking out!
http://www.buckhorn.com/ $$$ - be sure to make a reservation a few days in advance. The Buckhorn has liquor license #1. Rocky Mountain Oysters. Denver’s original steakhouse, The Buckhorn Exchange is located in the city’s oldest neighborhood, just 5-minutes from downtown Denver -- with a light-rail stop right across the street. This National Historic Landmark and Western Museum has been serving the finest in Old West fare since 1893. Prime grade beef steaks, buffalo prime rib, elk, salmon, quail, game hen, and succulent baby-back pork ribs are just some of the marvelous offerings on the Buckhorn menu. Exotic appetizers such as alligator tail and buffalo sausage are available, and no dinner is complete without the house specialty, Rocky Mountain Oysters. For lunch we serve up a lighter fare including our renowned Grandma Fanny’s pot roast sandwich, enormous beef and buffalo burgers, bratwurst or rib platters, main course salads, and the Buckhorn’s famous bean soup. For dessert, the hot Dutch apple pie ala mode with cinnamon rum sauce, or the double-chocolate Rocky Road brownie are sinful experiences that will forever remind you of your visit to the one and only Buckhorn Exchange. Whether a quiet dinner for two, birthday, anniversary or an office celebration, we strongly recommend reservations. So call today for a unique -- and tasty -- historical Old West experience!
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Buckhorn Exchange Restaurant
1000 Osage St
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http://www.buckhorn.com/ $$$ - be sure to make a reservation a few days in advance. The Buckhorn has liquor license #1. Rocky Mountain Oysters. Denver’s original steakhouse, The Buckhorn Exchange is located in the city’s oldest neighborhood, just 5-minutes from downtown Denver -- with a light-rail stop right across the street. This National Historic Landmark and Western Museum has been serving the finest in Old West fare since 1893. Prime grade beef steaks, buffalo prime rib, elk, salmon, quail, game hen, and succulent baby-back pork ribs are just some of the marvelous offerings on the Buckhorn menu. Exotic appetizers such as alligator tail and buffalo sausage are available, and no dinner is complete without the house specialty, Rocky Mountain Oysters. For lunch we serve up a lighter fare including our renowned Grandma Fanny’s pot roast sandwich, enormous beef and buffalo burgers, bratwurst or rib platters, main course salads, and the Buckhorn’s famous bean soup. For dessert, the hot Dutch apple pie ala mode with cinnamon rum sauce, or the double-chocolate Rocky Road brownie are sinful experiences that will forever remind you of your visit to the one and only Buckhorn Exchange. Whether a quiet dinner for two, birthday, anniversary or an office celebration, we strongly recommend reservations. So call today for a unique -- and tasty -- historical Old West experience!
https://www.insidescoopdenver.com/ Great local ice cream shop with homemade icecream. Lots of flavor that rotate constantly. Always busy and always delicious!
Inside Scoop Creamery
5654 South Prince Street
https://www.insidescoopdenver.com/ Great local ice cream shop with homemade icecream. Lots of flavor that rotate constantly. Always busy and always delicious!
http://www.mckinners.com/?utm_source=local&utm_medium=organic&utm_campaign=gmb Good pizza and atmosphere
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McKinners Pizza Bar
2389 W Main St
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http://www.mckinners.com/?utm_source=local&utm_medium=organic&utm_campaign=gmb Good pizza and atmosphere
https://www.toastygoodness.com/ A super popular breakfast spot in downtown Littleton at Santa Fe & Alamo. I have never been as I refuse to wait more than half an hour for a table, anywhere. I hear it is A-M-A-Z-I-N-G!
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Toast Fine Food & Coffee
2700 West Bowles Avenue
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https://www.toastygoodness.com/ A super popular breakfast spot in downtown Littleton at Santa Fe & Alamo. I have never been as I refuse to wait more than half an hour for a table, anywhere. I hear it is A-M-A-Z-I-N-G!
https://www.dirtcoffee.org/ Apparently there's this really great little coffee place close by. I've never been but I've heard great stuff!
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DIRT Coffee Bar
5767 S Rapp St
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https://www.dirtcoffee.org/ Apparently there's this really great little coffee place close by. I've never been but I've heard great stuff!
https://littletonmarket.com/ ittleton Market hosts unique products local to Colorado. We carry vendors from Fort Collins, Parker, Elizabeth, Vail, Longmont, and more. We take pride in leaving out the wholesaler, and working directly with the vendor. This means more money for them, and gives the market the opportunity to learn about the vendor and why they do what they do. For Littleton Market, it's not about taking from customers, it's about connecting with them.
Littleton Market
2692 W Alamo Ave
https://littletonmarket.com/ ittleton Market hosts unique products local to Colorado. We carry vendors from Fort Collins, Parker, Elizabeth, Vail, Longmont, and more. We take pride in leaving out the wholesaler, and working directly with the vendor. This means more money for them, and gives the market the opportunity to learn about the vendor and why they do what they do. For Littleton Market, it's not about taking from customers, it's about connecting with them.
https://www.curdscheese.com/ AMAZING cheese curds and smoked artichokes - my favorite! Our selection comes from the best producers all over the globe, ensuring we have a wide assortment of quality products that we know you’ll just love. ​Learn all about Curds Cheese and what we offer here, or better yet stop by the shop to see what the buzz around us is all about!
Curds Gourmet Cheese Shop & European Deli
2449 W Main St
https://www.curdscheese.com/ AMAZING cheese curds and smoked artichokes - my favorite! Our selection comes from the best producers all over the globe, ensuring we have a wide assortment of quality products that we know you’ll just love. ​Learn all about Curds Cheese and what we offer here, or better yet stop by the shop to see what the buzz around us is all about!
Another restaurant people seem to love. I am not a fan. Free valet parking.
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Smokin Fins Restaurant
2575 West Main Street
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Another restaurant people seem to love. I am not a fan. Free valet parking.
It's super close and smells amazing! The atmosphere is kinda retro and they have a rooftop dining area. The coffee mug prices are obscene (in case you think you might want to take one home as a souvenir.)
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Bacon Social House
2100 W Littleton Blvd
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It's super close and smells amazing! The atmosphere is kinda retro and they have a rooftop dining area. The coffee mug prices are obscene (in case you think you might want to take one home as a souvenir.)
Located in: Woodlawn Center Address: 1500 W Littleton Blvd, Littleton, CO 80120 My favorite local diner. No frills, seat yourself , good food, fast!
Louis' Diner
1500 W Littleton Blvd
Located in: Woodlawn Center Address: 1500 W Littleton Blvd, Littleton, CO 80120 My favorite local diner. No frills, seat yourself , good food, fast!
https://littleton-cafe.com/ Popular breakfast spot for a cheap, good meal. Waitstaff is always super friendly and prices can't be beat. DO NOT sit near the bathrooms (trust me on this one)!
Littleton Cafe
1409 West Littleton Boulevard
https://littleton-cafe.com/ Popular breakfast spot for a cheap, good meal. Waitstaff is always super friendly and prices can't be beat. DO NOT sit near the bathrooms (trust me on this one)!
https://littleton-cafe.com/ Great place to eat. Fills up fast but worth the wait.
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Cafe Terracotta
5649 South Curtice Street
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https://littleton-cafe.com/ Great place to eat. Fills up fast but worth the wait.
https://theplatteriverbarandgrill.com/ Eat good food on a great deck! Motorcycle people love this place.
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Platte River Bar & Grill
5995 South Santa Fe Drive
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https://theplatteriverbarandgrill.com/ Eat good food on a great deck! Motorcycle people love this place.

Concerts

https://www.hudsongardens.org/ Evelyn and Colonel King Hudson loved their estate on the banks of the South Platte River in Littleton and shared their enjoyment with the thousands who came to visit their Country Kitchen restaurant during its twenty-year operation. After King's death, Evelyn set up in 1986 the foundation that bears her and her husband's name with the purpose, "to preserve, maintain and enhance the natural beauty of [the] property...for the esthetic enjoyment and education of the public...." A year later, in her will Evelyn Hudson was a little more specific: "...It is my express desire that the real property received by the Foundation under this bequest be retained by the Foundation and administered in such fashion as to preserve and/or enhance the natural beauty of such real property for the aesthetic enjoyment for education of the public under conditions of use best suited to ensure and foster such enjoyment and use." After Evelyn's death the Foundation's Board of Directors developed a Statement of Purpose that was revised until it became its current Mission Statement. It reads, "Hudson Gardens seeks to promote the cause of beautification through horticulture by creating and operating a regional display garden available to all people for their education and enjoyment." Hudson Gardens, which has literally grown from Evelyn and King Hudson's legacy of land and assets that they had built up over a period of almost fifty years, continues to bring beauty, enjoyment and education to the people. Evelyn Leigh was born in Aurora, Illinois on February 23, 1905. She studied restaurant operation at the Lewis Institute in Chicago and developed skills as a food professional when she managed four Chicago department store restaurants. She had always hoped for her own "tea house." King C. Hudson hailed from Topeka, Kansas. He was born June 4, 1893. In 1915 he graduated from the Northwestern University dental school and seven years later secured a law degree from the Chicago Kent College of Law. He taught dietetics at Northwestern. During World War I he was in the Army dental corps and continued as a reserve officer while conducting a private dental practice in Chicago. Evelyn Leigh and King Hudson were married in Chicago June 17, 1940. When World War II threatened, he was recalled to active duty and served at Fitzsimmons Army Hospital and at Fort Logan near Denver. Once in Colorado, Evelyn began the quest for her own restaurant. Houstoun Waring, writing in the Littleton Independent in 1988 said, "She kept looking for a good site and found the Gutheil [property] at 6115 South Santa Fe Drive on the east side of the South Platte. What drew her to the place were the enormous trees and the rhubarb plants." The Colonel, who shared Evelyn's enthusiasm, resigned from the Army, and they began to build their log Country Kitchen restaurant in December 1941. The first unit opened in May 1942. The large room on the south, that became the main dining room, was added in 1945. The Hudsons lived in an apartment in the building. Littleton old-timers told them, "It will never succeed if you go off Main Street." Worse than that, the site was on a dirt road ten miles from the heart of Denver, an unlikely location to start a restaurant. Writing later about the Country Kitchen's opening in 1942, Houstoun Waring said, "Some evenings brought sparse patronage...Col. Hudson suggested having a smorgasbord each Thursday. Seventy tempting dishes (for $1.25) were prepared, and the crowds came. The smorgasbord [became] a nightly treat. So were sit-down meals with Evelyn's favorite delicacies--fried chicken, scalloped potatoes, Swedish rye bread and corn sticks." They served fresh vegetables, many of which were grown on the grounds. A small "lettuce house" behind the main building was where the salads were prepared. The excellence of their restaurant became well known and was recognized by Life magazine in its Famous Roadside Inns for Travelers in America. Duncan Hines rated the restaurant highly, and it was featured in an issue of Ford Times. Adding to its appeal was its style, warmth and antique accessories. The Country Kitchen was so successful that the Hudsons eventually were able to operate it for only six months each year, closing from October through March. During the winter months they traveled the world to sightsee and to experience culinary delights. Houstoun Waring wrote that upon their return, they often gave their travel notes to Bill Hosakawa of the Denver Post to write the little booklets called Tummy Travels, which Bob Ramsey of Littleton illustrated. The logo was a horse-drawn buggy-seemingly dashing to the Country Kitchen. The Hudsons increased their acreage until it became a lovely estate of almost forty acres. They cared for their riverbank land with an environmental consciousness rarely seen in that era. After twenty years of operating their country inn, the Hudsons retired in 1962 and leased the restaurant to other operators who opened the North Woods Inn. Just before retirement, King designed their new home that incorporated a very old house on the property. Located behind the inn and close to the river, it afforded a mountain view and an opportunity to display the many interesting items collected during their travels. King continued to plant even more trees and indulged his love of raising prize American Saddle Bred horses. Evelyn set to work to make Littleton the most beautiful city possible. She encouraged garden clubs and scouts to plant flowers in parks and at the entrances to Littleton. In 1971 the newspaper honored her with its "Most Valuable Citizen" award. Also in the 1970s she traveled to Washington, D. C. to accept the "Keep America Beautiful Award." King Hudson died March 2, 1984 at age ninety. Soon afterwards Evelyn set up the Colonel King C. and Evelyn Leigh Hudson Foundation. It was incorporated in March 1986. The Foundation's first board of directors were Evelyn Hudson, Chairman, Dee Gustafson, Donald Hadfield (Evelyn's nephew) and Marilyn Schalge. Evelyn died July 7, 1988 at eighty-three. The Hudson estate was valued at about $5.25 million; except for several bequests to family members and friends, the bulk of it was left to the Foundation. As noted above, the land that the Hudsons accumulated was approximately forty acres. Before her death, Evelyn had sold about eight acres for relocation of the South Platte River channel. A tract of about two acres lay on the west side of the river and was eventually sold by the Foundation to the South Suburban Park and Recreation District and became part of their Centennial golf course. This left about thirty acres, three of which was under lease to the North Woods Inn restaurant. When the lease expired in November 1997, the Hudson Foundation regained possession of the log building and its surrounding acreage, making thirty acres of usable space to carry out its mission. In May 1987 the Foundation received its classification as a private, non-profit 501(c)(3) foundation, and in January 1993 it was classified as a private operating foundation. In the early 1990s the Foundation bought the Woodward property directly north of Hudson's original lane. The small house there is used for offices. The Foundation contracted with landscape architect Doug Rockne in 1991. In April 1992 it retained the services of Andrew Pierce as an independent consultant for horticultural design to work with Rockne's garden design. Pierce's initial contract was followed by a series of contract extensions. His job was to implement the landscape plan already established by the Foundation. He was subsequently hired as Director of Horticulture and Education. Map - Hudson Gardens Hand-drawnThe result became Hudson Gardens, thirty acres of flowers, shrubs, trees, ponds and paths at 6115 South Santa Fe, alongside the South Platte River and the popular Mary Carter Greenway. It opened in June 1996. The Garden Variety gift shop opened in August that year. In November 1997 South Suburban Park and Recreation District purchased the buildings and grounds. Under the management contract between the District and the Foundation, the Foundation continues to operate the Gardens. South Suburban provides some, but not all, of the annual operating budget. The balance is made up by garden attendance, memberships, space rentals and fundraising. Hudson Gardens was originally sixteen distinct gardens, from a rose garden to a water garden to an alpine rock garden, all composed of plants that grow well in Colorado's climate. In 2000 the XeriscapeTM garden and a G-gauge garden railroad were added. The Gardens currently include an herb garden, iris display bed, Monet's Place, songbird garden, Victoria water lily pond, wildflower meadow, dahlia display bed and more. Park - Hudson Gardens GrassesA second entrance leads from the Mary Carter Greenway trail into the gardens. Beside it is a popular snack bar that is open during spring and summer. The demonstration building and the demonstration garden are nearby. A corps of volunteers is used at almost every level throughout the Gardens operation. Now known as Hudson Gardens and Events Center, the site is a popular place for weddings, concerts and seasonal holiday events. The Gardens offer a canopy that accommodates 250 people and a stage with lawn seating for an audience of 2,500. A complete schedule of events appears on the web site at http://www.hudsongardens.org. The log restaurant was beautifully renovated in 1997 and is now known as The Inn at Hudson Gardens. It seats 250 people and is available for catered events. It and the canopy and stage setting are booked far in advance. The Hudson residence is used for administrative offices and board meetings. The Gardens are open year round with an entrance fee from April to October for non-members. Membership in the organization includes free admission to the Gardens and reduced charge for activities. The historic log structure, the former Country Kitchen where it all began, is treasured as the source of the generous legacy of land and assets that was left by the Hudsons to be developed as a beautiful garden "available to all people for their education and enjoyment."
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The Hudson Gardens & Event Center
6115 South Santa Fe Drive
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https://www.hudsongardens.org/ Evelyn and Colonel King Hudson loved their estate on the banks of the South Platte River in Littleton and shared their enjoyment with the thousands who came to visit their Country Kitchen restaurant during its twenty-year operation. After King's death, Evelyn set up in 1986 the foundation that bears her and her husband's name with the purpose, "to preserve, maintain and enhance the natural beauty of [the] property...for the esthetic enjoyment and education of the public...." A year later, in her will Evelyn Hudson was a little more specific: "...It is my express desire that the real property received by the Foundation under this bequest be retained by the Foundation and administered in such fashion as to preserve and/or enhance the natural beauty of such real property for the aesthetic enjoyment for education of the public under conditions of use best suited to ensure and foster such enjoyment and use." After Evelyn's death the Foundation's Board of Directors developed a Statement of Purpose that was revised until it became its current Mission Statement. It reads, "Hudson Gardens seeks to promote the cause of beautification through horticulture by creating and operating a regional display garden available to all people for their education and enjoyment." Hudson Gardens, which has literally grown from Evelyn and King Hudson's legacy of land and assets that they had built up over a period of almost fifty years, continues to bring beauty, enjoyment and education to the people. Evelyn Leigh was born in Aurora, Illinois on February 23, 1905. She studied restaurant operation at the Lewis Institute in Chicago and developed skills as a food professional when she managed four Chicago department store restaurants. She had always hoped for her own "tea house." King C. Hudson hailed from Topeka, Kansas. He was born June 4, 1893. In 1915 he graduated from the Northwestern University dental school and seven years later secured a law degree from the Chicago Kent College of Law. He taught dietetics at Northwestern. During World War I he was in the Army dental corps and continued as a reserve officer while conducting a private dental practice in Chicago. Evelyn Leigh and King Hudson were married in Chicago June 17, 1940. When World War II threatened, he was recalled to active duty and served at Fitzsimmons Army Hospital and at Fort Logan near Denver. Once in Colorado, Evelyn began the quest for her own restaurant. Houstoun Waring, writing in the Littleton Independent in 1988 said, "She kept looking for a good site and found the Gutheil [property] at 6115 South Santa Fe Drive on the east side of the South Platte. What drew her to the place were the enormous trees and the rhubarb plants." The Colonel, who shared Evelyn's enthusiasm, resigned from the Army, and they began to build their log Country Kitchen restaurant in December 1941. The first unit opened in May 1942. The large room on the south, that became the main dining room, was added in 1945. The Hudsons lived in an apartment in the building. Littleton old-timers told them, "It will never succeed if you go off Main Street." Worse than that, the site was on a dirt road ten miles from the heart of Denver, an unlikely location to start a restaurant. Writing later about the Country Kitchen's opening in 1942, Houstoun Waring said, "Some evenings brought sparse patronage...Col. Hudson suggested having a smorgasbord each Thursday. Seventy tempting dishes (for $1.25) were prepared, and the crowds came. The smorgasbord [became] a nightly treat. So were sit-down meals with Evelyn's favorite delicacies--fried chicken, scalloped potatoes, Swedish rye bread and corn sticks." They served fresh vegetables, many of which were grown on the grounds. A small "lettuce house" behind the main building was where the salads were prepared. The excellence of their restaurant became well known and was recognized by Life magazine in its Famous Roadside Inns for Travelers in America. Duncan Hines rated the restaurant highly, and it was featured in an issue of Ford Times. Adding to its appeal was its style, warmth and antique accessories. The Country Kitchen was so successful that the Hudsons eventually were able to operate it for only six months each year, closing from October through March. During the winter months they traveled the world to sightsee and to experience culinary delights. Houstoun Waring wrote that upon their return, they often gave their travel notes to Bill Hosakawa of the Denver Post to write the little booklets called Tummy Travels, which Bob Ramsey of Littleton illustrated. The logo was a horse-drawn buggy-seemingly dashing to the Country Kitchen. The Hudsons increased their acreage until it became a lovely estate of almost forty acres. They cared for their riverbank land with an environmental consciousness rarely seen in that era. After twenty years of operating their country inn, the Hudsons retired in 1962 and leased the restaurant to other operators who opened the North Woods Inn. Just before retirement, King designed their new home that incorporated a very old house on the property. Located behind the inn and close to the river, it afforded a mountain view and an opportunity to display the many interesting items collected during their travels. King continued to plant even more trees and indulged his love of raising prize American Saddle Bred horses. Evelyn set to work to make Littleton the most beautiful city possible. She encouraged garden clubs and scouts to plant flowers in parks and at the entrances to Littleton. In 1971 the newspaper honored her with its "Most Valuable Citizen" award. Also in the 1970s she traveled to Washington, D. C. to accept the "Keep America Beautiful Award." King Hudson died March 2, 1984 at age ninety. Soon afterwards Evelyn set up the Colonel King C. and Evelyn Leigh Hudson Foundation. It was incorporated in March 1986. The Foundation's first board of directors were Evelyn Hudson, Chairman, Dee Gustafson, Donald Hadfield (Evelyn's nephew) and Marilyn Schalge. Evelyn died July 7, 1988 at eighty-three. The Hudson estate was valued at about $5.25 million; except for several bequests to family members and friends, the bulk of it was left to the Foundation. As noted above, the land that the Hudsons accumulated was approximately forty acres. Before her death, Evelyn had sold about eight acres for relocation of the South Platte River channel. A tract of about two acres lay on the west side of the river and was eventually sold by the Foundation to the South Suburban Park and Recreation District and became part of their Centennial golf course. This left about thirty acres, three of which was under lease to the North Woods Inn restaurant. When the lease expired in November 1997, the Hudson Foundation regained possession of the log building and its surrounding acreage, making thirty acres of usable space to carry out its mission. In May 1987 the Foundation received its classification as a private, non-profit 501(c)(3) foundation, and in January 1993 it was classified as a private operating foundation. In the early 1990s the Foundation bought the Woodward property directly north of Hudson's original lane. The small house there is used for offices. The Foundation contracted with landscape architect Doug Rockne in 1991. In April 1992 it retained the services of Andrew Pierce as an independent consultant for horticultural design to work with Rockne's garden design. Pierce's initial contract was followed by a series of contract extensions. His job was to implement the landscape plan already established by the Foundation. He was subsequently hired as Director of Horticulture and Education. Map - Hudson Gardens Hand-drawnThe result became Hudson Gardens, thirty acres of flowers, shrubs, trees, ponds and paths at 6115 South Santa Fe, alongside the South Platte River and the popular Mary Carter Greenway. It opened in June 1996. The Garden Variety gift shop opened in August that year. In November 1997 South Suburban Park and Recreation District purchased the buildings and grounds. Under the management contract between the District and the Foundation, the Foundation continues to operate the Gardens. South Suburban provides some, but not all, of the annual operating budget. The balance is made up by garden attendance, memberships, space rentals and fundraising. Hudson Gardens was originally sixteen distinct gardens, from a rose garden to a water garden to an alpine rock garden, all composed of plants that grow well in Colorado's climate. In 2000 the XeriscapeTM garden and a G-gauge garden railroad were added. The Gardens currently include an herb garden, iris display bed, Monet's Place, songbird garden, Victoria water lily pond, wildflower meadow, dahlia display bed and more. Park - Hudson Gardens GrassesA second entrance leads from the Mary Carter Greenway trail into the gardens. Beside it is a popular snack bar that is open during spring and summer. The demonstration building and the demonstration garden are nearby. A corps of volunteers is used at almost every level throughout the Gardens operation. Now known as Hudson Gardens and Events Center, the site is a popular place for weddings, concerts and seasonal holiday events. The Gardens offer a canopy that accommodates 250 people and a stage with lawn seating for an audience of 2,500. A complete schedule of events appears on the web site at http://www.hudsongardens.org. The log restaurant was beautifully renovated in 1997 and is now known as The Inn at Hudson Gardens. It seats 250 people and is available for catered events. It and the canopy and stage setting are booked far in advance. The Hudson residence is used for administrative offices and board meetings. The Gardens are open year round with an entrance fee from April to October for non-members. Membership in the organization includes free admission to the Gardens and reduced charge for activities. The historic log structure, the former Country Kitchen where it all began, is treasured as the source of the generous legacy of land and assets that was left by the Hudsons to be developed as a beautiful garden "available to all people for their education and enjoyment."
https://www.redrocksonline.com/about/history-geology Arguably the best concert venue in the world
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Red Rocks Park and Amphitheatre
18300 W Alameda Pkwy
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https://www.redrocksonline.com/about/history-geology Arguably the best concert venue in the world
Great venue to catch a concert
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Fiddler's Green Amphitheatre
6350 Greenwood Plaza Blvd
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Great venue to catch a concert

Family Fun

Some great places to explore with the family
https://www.littletongov.org/city-services/city-departments/museum The Littleton Museum offers visitors a unique link between Littleton's past and present. Located on 40 acres adjacent to Ketring Lake, it encompasses three exhibition galleries, a children's interactive gallery, research center, lecture hall, and two 19th-century living history farm sites. The 1860s homestead farm and the 1890s turn-of-the-century urban farm represent how people lived and worked during the early years in Littleton and the South Platte Valley. Museum staff and volunteers dressed in period-appropriate costumes, work on the farm sites, run the working blacksmith shop, and teach in Littleton's first one-room school house, offering a "living history' perspective to the museum visitor. The permanent gallery exhibits a comprehensive historical look at Littleton from pre-history to the present through graphics, photography, and artifacts from the museum's collections. The fine arts gallery hosts original art and photography, including exhibits sponsored by the Littleton Fine Arts Board. The changing gallery displays temporary and traveling exhibits from the Smithsonian Institution, other museums, and the Littleton Museum's collections. For the museum's younger visitors, the Kids' Connection provides interactive hands-on exhibits and activities. The research center containing the museum's non-circulating collection of books, manuscripts, maps, and photographs focused on Littleton and the surrounding area is open to the public by appointment. Staff and volunteers are available to assist with research. The Littleton Museum is accredited by the American Alliance of Museums and was the first museum in Colorado to be recognized as an Affiliate of the Smithsonian Institution. From a child's delight at seeing the animals on the farm sites, to scholarly exploration in the research center, to attending one of the many events on the museum grounds, there is something for everyone to experience and enjoy at the Littleton Museum.
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Littleton Museum
6028 South Gallup Street
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https://www.littletongov.org/city-services/city-departments/museum The Littleton Museum offers visitors a unique link between Littleton's past and present. Located on 40 acres adjacent to Ketring Lake, it encompasses three exhibition galleries, a children's interactive gallery, research center, lecture hall, and two 19th-century living history farm sites. The 1860s homestead farm and the 1890s turn-of-the-century urban farm represent how people lived and worked during the early years in Littleton and the South Platte Valley. Museum staff and volunteers dressed in period-appropriate costumes, work on the farm sites, run the working blacksmith shop, and teach in Littleton's first one-room school house, offering a "living history' perspective to the museum visitor. The permanent gallery exhibits a comprehensive historical look at Littleton from pre-history to the present through graphics, photography, and artifacts from the museum's collections. The fine arts gallery hosts original art and photography, including exhibits sponsored by the Littleton Fine Arts Board. The changing gallery displays temporary and traveling exhibits from the Smithsonian Institution, other museums, and the Littleton Museum's collections. For the museum's younger visitors, the Kids' Connection provides interactive hands-on exhibits and activities. The research center containing the museum's non-circulating collection of books, manuscripts, maps, and photographs focused on Littleton and the surrounding area is open to the public by appointment. Staff and volunteers are available to assist with research. The Littleton Museum is accredited by the American Alliance of Museums and was the first museum in Colorado to be recognized as an Affiliate of the Smithsonian Institution. From a child's delight at seeing the animals on the farm sites, to scholarly exploration in the research center, to attending one of the many events on the museum grounds, there is something for everyone to experience and enjoy at the Littleton Museum.
http://www.piratescovecolorado.com/ Great local outdoor waterpark, fun for the whole family
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Pirates Cove Water Park
1225 West Belleview Avenue
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http://www.piratescovecolorado.com/ Great local outdoor waterpark, fun for the whole family
http://www.ssprd.org/cornerstone-park Local park with mini golf, splash pad, playground, soccer fields, skate park, tennis, shuffleboard and pickle ball cou rts and batting cages located near baseball fields on NE corner of Belleview and Windermere St.
Cornerstone Park
5150 S Windermere St
http://www.ssprd.org/cornerstone-park Local park with mini golf, splash pad, playground, soccer fields, skate park, tennis, shuffleboard and pickle ball cou rts and batting cages located near baseball fields on NE corner of Belleview and Windermere St.
https://drafthouse.com/denver/theater/littleton Stuff your face while you watch cool movies. Do NOT talk or be otherwise disruptive during the movie (you will get kicked out)
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Alamo Drafthouse Cinema Littleton
7301 S Santa Fe Dr
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https://drafthouse.com/denver/theater/littleton Stuff your face while you watch cool movies. Do NOT talk or be otherwise disruptive during the movie (you will get kicked out)
http://www.casabonitadenver.com/about/ Come for the atmosphere. That's it.
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Casa Bonita
6715 West Colfax Avenue
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http://www.casabonitadenver.com/about/ Come for the atmosphere. That's it.
Hit balls into the water! Way better (and cheaper) than Top Golf!
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Aqua Golf
501 West Florida Avenue
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Hit balls into the water! Way better (and cheaper) than Top Golf!
https://www.reinkebrothers.com/ Amazing costume and magic shop packed to the gills with cool stuff. Go and meander and take it all in. They put on a haunted house around Halloween and farmer's markets and other parking lot shindigs throughout the year. Super fun for everyone!
Reinke Brothers
5663 S Prince St
https://www.reinkebrothers.com/ Amazing costume and magic shop packed to the gills with cool stuff. Go and meander and take it all in. They put on a haunted house around Halloween and farmer's markets and other parking lot shindigs throughout the year. Super fun for everyone!
http://www.ssprd.org/Colorado-Journey MINI GOLF!!!!!!!
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Colorado Journey Miniature Golf
5150 South Windermere Street
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http://www.ssprd.org/Colorado-Journey MINI GOLF!!!!!!!
https://littleton.visitseaquest.com/ My kids love this place and I've enjoyed it when we've gone. Locals are a bit salty towards the owner and operations with some not so great things that went down when they were starting up. I don't know. I just love me some sting rays, feeding them and sitting in the little cave under the water watching them glide over our heads.
SeaQuest Littleton
8501 W Bowles Ave
https://littleton.visitseaquest.com/ My kids love this place and I've enjoyed it when we've gone. Locals are a bit salty towards the owner and operations with some not so great things that went down when they were starting up. I don't know. I just love me some sting rays, feeding them and sitting in the little cave under the water watching them glide over our heads.
https://www.mychildsmuseum.org/ Crappy parking situation, way too crowded. Lots of fun, though!
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Children's Museum of Denver at Marsico Campus
2121 Children's Museum Drive
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https://www.mychildsmuseum.org/ Crappy parking situation, way too crowded. Lots of fun, though!
https://www.aquariumrestaurants.com/downtownaquariumdenver/ Pricey but fun. Get caught in a desert rainstorm and flash flood, watch the tigers get fed, pet the sting rays and get pics with the mermaids. The restaurant is very good, but also pricey.
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Downtown Aquarium
700 Water Street
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https://www.aquariumrestaurants.com/downtownaquariumdenver/ Pricey but fun. Get caught in a desert rainstorm and flash flood, watch the tigers get fed, pet the sting rays and get pics with the mermaids. The restaurant is very good, but also pricey.
An amusement park that in no way resembles the late, great Elitch Gardens (R.I.P.)
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Elitch Gardens
2000 Elitch Circle
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An amusement park that in no way resembles the late, great Elitch Gardens (R.I.P.)
Good, old fashioned sketchy fun. Small amusement park, fun train around the lake. Go during daylight hours.
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Lakeside Amusement Park
4601 Sheridan Boulevard
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Good, old fashioned sketchy fun. Small amusement park, fun train around the lake. Go during daylight hours.
Super fun and interactive murder mystery dinner theater in a former mortuary! Get there early for a parking spot in the back lot. Not for super small kids.
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Adams Mystery Playhouse
2406 Federal Blvd
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Super fun and interactive murder mystery dinner theater in a former mortuary! Get there early for a parking spot in the back lot. Not for super small kids.
https://www.k1speed.com/denver-location.html Go Karting!
K1 Speed
8034 Midway Dr
https://www.k1speed.com/denver-location.html Go Karting!
https://www.iflyworld.com/denver/ Indoor Skydiving
iFLY Denver
9230 Park Meadows Dr
https://www.iflyworld.com/denver/ Indoor Skydiving
https://www.englewoodco.gov/parks-recreation-library/parks/belleview-park-attractions Locate directly East of Pirate's Cove, Belleview Park Train and Petting Zoo is easy to miss. It's a fun little train with an adorable petting zoo. If you can't find it, ask any local where to find the train at the airplane park.
Belleview Park Train
5001 S Inca Dr
https://www.englewoodco.gov/parks-recreation-library/parks/belleview-park-attractions Locate directly East of Pirate's Cove, Belleview Park Train and Petting Zoo is easy to miss. It's a fun little train with an adorable petting zoo. If you can't find it, ask any local where to find the train at the airplane park.
http://tinytownrailroad.com/ It's literally a tiny town. Pack a picnic lunch and check out the tiny buildings. Be sure to ride the train and play at the newish playground.
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Tiny Town & Railroad
6249 South Turkey Creek Road
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http://tinytownrailroad.com/ It's literally a tiny town. Pack a picnic lunch and check out the tiny buildings. Be sure to ride the train and play at the newish playground.
https://coloradorailroadmuseum.org/?gclid=EAIaIQobChMItunI0oCJ4wIVjMVkCh2XfAA5EAAYASAAEgKnevD_BwE Fun place to spend a few hours. Be sure to ride the Galloping Goose!
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Colorado Railroad Museum
17155 West 44th Avenue
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https://coloradorailroadmuseum.org/?gclid=EAIaIQobChMItunI0oCJ4wIVjMVkCh2XfAA5EAAYASAAEgKnevD_BwE Fun place to spend a few hours. Be sure to ride the Galloping Goose!

Sightseeing

Beautiful rose garden located just steps from my property. Popular for wedding and picnics. Stop and smell the roses ;)
War Memorial Rose Garden
5804 S Bemis St
Beautiful rose garden located just steps from my property. Popular for wedding and picnics. Stop and smell the roses ;)
https://www.littletongov.org/my-littleton/littleton-history/biographies/packer Beautiful local cemetery and final resting place of the infamous Alfred Packer.
Littleton Cemetery Association
6155 S Prince St
https://www.littletongov.org/my-littleton/littleton-history/biographies/packer Beautiful local cemetery and final resting place of the infamous Alfred Packer.

Shopping

Great way to waste a day. Wear comfortable shoes and leave room for the swedish meatballs at the cafeteria!
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IKEA
9800 East IKEA Way
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Great way to waste a day. Wear comfortable shoes and leave room for the swedish meatballs at the cafeteria!
https://www.shopsouthglenn.com/ Outdoor Shopping mall with movie theatre
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The Streets at SouthGlenn
6991 South Vine Street
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https://www.shopsouthglenn.com/ Outdoor Shopping mall with movie theatre
https://aspengrovecenter.com/ Outdoor Shopping Center
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Aspen Grove
7301 South Santa Fe Drive
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https://aspengrovecenter.com/ Outdoor Shopping Center
https://www.southwestplaza.com/en.html It's an indoor mall. It has shops. Play areas for the kids and an aquarium.
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Southwest Plaza
8501 W Bowles Ave
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https://www.southwestplaza.com/en.html It's an indoor mall. It has shops. Play areas for the kids and an aquarium.
https://littleton-cafe.com/ Islesandislesandislesandisles of cool stuff. You can spend A LOT of time (and money) in this place.
Colorado Antique Gallery
5501 S Broadway
https://littleton-cafe.com/ Islesandislesandislesandisles of cool stuff. You can spend A LOT of time (and money) in this place.
https://www.thechocolatetherapist.com/ The Chocolate Therapist is a unique chocolate, wine and coffee shop with on-site chocolate production. We handcraft small batches of our chocolate bars, patties and chocolate meltaways with all-natural chocolate ingredients. There are no dyes, preservatives or artificial ingredients in anything we make. Our dark chocolate is naturally gluten-free and most of our products are also soy-free. Organic flavoring oils, locally roasted nuts and dried berries round out the premium ingredient profile…it’s like no other chocolate! In The Beginning... Author Julie Nygard launched The Chocolate Therapist to introduce the extraordinary, all-natural chocolate that supports the research in her book: The Chocolate Therapist: A User’s Guide to the Extraordinary Health Benefits of Chocolate. In it, you’ll discover how to enjoy a little chocolate every day, for the benefit of health, without gaining weight. A daily chocolate consumer herself, she believes that the only difference between guilt-laden versus guilt-free chocolate enjoyment is simply education.
The Chocolate Therapist
2560 West Main Street
https://www.thechocolatetherapist.com/ The Chocolate Therapist is a unique chocolate, wine and coffee shop with on-site chocolate production. We handcraft small batches of our chocolate bars, patties and chocolate meltaways with all-natural chocolate ingredients. There are no dyes, preservatives or artificial ingredients in anything we make. Our dark chocolate is naturally gluten-free and most of our products are also soy-free. Organic flavoring oils, locally roasted nuts and dried berries round out the premium ingredient profile…it’s like no other chocolate! In The Beginning... Author Julie Nygard launched The Chocolate Therapist to introduce the extraordinary, all-natural chocolate that supports the research in her book: The Chocolate Therapist: A User’s Guide to the Extraordinary Health Benefits of Chocolate. In it, you’ll discover how to enjoy a little chocolate every day, for the benefit of health, without gaining weight. A daily chocolate consumer herself, she believes that the only difference between guilt-laden versus guilt-free chocolate enjoyment is simply education.

Breweries

https://www.jackasshillbrewery.com/ Popular local brewery. Jackass Hill has long held a spot of prominence in the Littleton area. Not only for its historic connection but also its scenic overlook of the South Platte River valley. It was the sun setting over this majestic valley, tucking away behind the stoic peaks of the Colorado Rockies, that captured the imagination of the founders of Jackass Hill Brewery. The founders are Littleton childhood friends: Pat Somers, Chuck and Roseanne Thenell, Kevin Miller, and their Colorado friend, Jeff Bennett. After building a house at the top of Jackass Hill 24 years ago, Pat would invite friends and family over to enjoy the view. It was sitting out on his front porch on Jackass Hill Road, with a cold beer in hand, watching the last sunbeams turn to dusk with friends and family, that Pat dubbed his front porch Jackass Hill Brewery. About 7 years ago, with a creative mind and entrepreneurial spirit, Pat decided to create some T-shirts to celebrate the many years of creating great moments at “Jackass Hill Brewery”. Already in the apparel business, Pat was able to create some T-shirts with the fun Jackass Hill Brewery logo. Although initially, the T-shirts were intended to be tongue-in-cheek for friends and family, others in the community were asking for them. Pat has been selling these “brewery” T-shirts at local Littleton events, including booths at Western Welcome days. In the more recent years, his friends & fellow T-shirt owners kept ribbing him about it, “Hey, when ya going to open that Jackass Hill Brewery?”…. Now is the time! Jackass Hill Brewery is a celebration of that beautiful spot on the hill, its history and the owners’ family roots in the Littleton community. And of course, a love for great craft beer and belief that beer celebrates memorable moments with friends and family.
Jackass Hill Brewery
2409 W Main St
https://www.jackasshillbrewery.com/ Popular local brewery. Jackass Hill has long held a spot of prominence in the Littleton area. Not only for its historic connection but also its scenic overlook of the South Platte River valley. It was the sun setting over this majestic valley, tucking away behind the stoic peaks of the Colorado Rockies, that captured the imagination of the founders of Jackass Hill Brewery. The founders are Littleton childhood friends: Pat Somers, Chuck and Roseanne Thenell, Kevin Miller, and their Colorado friend, Jeff Bennett. After building a house at the top of Jackass Hill 24 years ago, Pat would invite friends and family over to enjoy the view. It was sitting out on his front porch on Jackass Hill Road, with a cold beer in hand, watching the last sunbeams turn to dusk with friends and family, that Pat dubbed his front porch Jackass Hill Brewery. About 7 years ago, with a creative mind and entrepreneurial spirit, Pat decided to create some T-shirts to celebrate the many years of creating great moments at “Jackass Hill Brewery”. Already in the apparel business, Pat was able to create some T-shirts with the fun Jackass Hill Brewery logo. Although initially, the T-shirts were intended to be tongue-in-cheek for friends and family, others in the community were asking for them. Pat has been selling these “brewery” T-shirts at local Littleton events, including booths at Western Welcome days. In the more recent years, his friends & fellow T-shirt owners kept ribbing him about it, “Hey, when ya going to open that Jackass Hill Brewery?”…. Now is the time! Jackass Hill Brewery is a celebration of that beautiful spot on the hill, its history and the owners’ family roots in the Littleton community. And of course, a love for great craft beer and belief that beer celebrates memorable moments with friends and family.
https://www.breckbrew.com/visit/littleton Sellouts, but still a fun place to visit. Pretty ok restaurant.
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Breckenridge Brewery
2920 Brewery Lane
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https://www.breckbrew.com/visit/littleton Sellouts, but still a fun place to visit. Pretty ok restaurant.
Go see where it all started and have some free beer after the tour! It's Coors, but it's Colorado!
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Coors Brewery Tour
13th Street
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Go see where it all started and have some free beer after the tour! It's Coors, but it's Colorado!
Fun little brewery in Littleton on the banks of the South Platte River.
Saint Patrick's Brewing Company
2842 W Bowles Ave
Fun little brewery in Littleton on the banks of the South Platte River.