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Top recommendations from locals

Library
“Research books about the history of Toronto or use the computers for free by signing up as a guest.”
  • 22 lokale anbefaler
Library
“Very unique part of Toronto. The Beaches has just that, Beaches. This is to be enjoyed in the summer time of course. Beach Volley Ball and swimming are popular here. ”
  • 20 lokale anbefaler
Library
“Nicest and newest library in the city with striking design, to sit in and relax with a book or work. It's all glass allowing plenty of natural light in. While not too big it is also not too busy, and any spot you find will give you a nice view of the outside.”
  • 13 lokale anbefaler
Library
“Beautiful architecture. Restored old with modern addition. Great children's section as well.”
  • 23 lokale anbefaler
Library
“One of the oldest and most beautiful public libraries located in a beautiful park.”
  • 8 lokale anbefaler
Library
“Our local library, if you wanted to get away to get some work done or just enjoy a book in a super bright and completely silent environment.”
  • 10 lokale anbefaler
Library
  • 1 lokal anbefaler
Library
“Coffeehouse known for its signature roasts, light bites and WiFi availability. Open late and fantastic service!”
  • 10 lokale anbefaler
Library
“The outside of this University of Toronto library is shaped like a turkey - yes, really!”
  • 11 lokale anbefaler
Library
“Port Credit is a great walking destination with hundreds of bars and restaurants and beautiful harbour to enjoy walking, kayaking or fishing. The location of Port Credit was in the 1700s, the land of the Mississauga Ojibwe band. The location became used as a meeting place between the band and write traders, and the river was known to them as the Missinhe or "trusting creek". To the French and later the English the mouth was known as "Port Credit" and a trading post was established in 1720, where goods were traded or bought on credit. The earliest reference is on a map drawn in 1757 by La Broquerie. The first permanent structure built by the English at the site was the Government Inn (1798–1861), on the east bank of the river. Lieutenant Governor John Graves Simcoe had ordered construction of the Inn to serve as a way station for travellers by land and lake, and it was leased to a succession of residents until its destruction by fire. In 1805, the Mississauga gave up much of the surrounding lands, but retained the Credit River, which they held in esteem as the favourite resort of their ancestors. After the War of 1812, the numbers of Mississauga dwindled and they gave up their lands except for a reserve at the mouth, believing the King would protect the land for them in the face of settler encroachment.[1] Outside the reserve, a village plan was laid out in 1834 and for several years, Port Credit was a thriving harbour community used by the natives and settlers jointly. Village lots were sold to settlers by the natives and the Port Credit Harbour Company, which developed the harbour, was jointly owned. The harbour was a working fishing port and a regional trading centre for grain and other agricultural products. A lighthouse was in use from 1882 to 1918 and remained standing until destroyed by fire in 1936”
  • 42 lokale anbefaler
Library
“Cute little library with very helpful staff, easy to print/scan anything or hop on a computer. ”
  • 8 lokale anbefaler
Library
“The basement of this library features a Toronto Junction history collection.”
  • 4 lokale anbefaler
Library
“Toronto has one of the best public library systems in the world, and this is the closest branch. ”
  • 3 lokale anbefaler
Library
“Cute and friendly public library. They have computers with printers and internet for free. You could also bring your laptop and use their wifi.”
  • 4 lokale anbefaler