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Top recommendations from locals

Historic Site
“White Tower is the main attraction of Thessaloniki. It is a fortification work of the 15th century Ottoman (probably built between 1450-70). It is now considered a characteristic monument of Thessaloniki and is what has been saved by the demolished Ottoman fortification of the city. The present form of the tower replaced a Byzantine fortification of the 12th century, to be used as a garrison of the Yanitsaron and as a prison of death. Today it operates as a museum and is one of the most famous building-symbols of cities in Greece. It has 6 floors, 34 meters high and 70 meters perimeter. The museum of White tower provides many historical facts about Thessaloniki and its ticket costs 4 euro. Maps: goo.gl/maps/dYX1viw7XLF2 Street: Leoforos Nikis”
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History Museum
“A Day at the museum In the Museum the visitor can visit the 11 galleries of the permanent exhibition and can travel back to the world of Byzantium through thematic sections concerning the daily private and public life, worship and the burial customs, architecture and art, the commercial and business activity. He/she can discover the continuity and the relationship between past and present. The audiovisual material and the touchscreens, which frame the main exhibition, inform on more special issues. In that way the visitor can have a complete picture of the Museum’s history, of the organization of the exhibition and of the management of the archaeological material, from the excavation to the Museum, until the final presentation. Furthermore he/she can learn things relating to the history of Museums internationally. Alongside, the visitor has the opportunity to visit, throughout the whole year, the temporary exhibitions organized by the Museum in the wing of temporary exhibitions “Kyriakos Krokos”, in the multipurpose hall “Eftychia Kourkoutidou-Nikolaidou”, in the reception hall or in the atrium. The themes of these exhibitions are not related only to the Byzantine period, but by organizing them we try to sensitize the public on issues of history, cultural heritage and art and on daily life of different societies and cultures. Moreover, the visitor can follow, free of charge, by using the entrance ticket, the thematic guided tours titled “An exhibit is narrating…” by an archaeologist of the Museum. Based on a sole exhibit or on a group of exhibits, the guided tour is preceded by a short film on the subject, shown at the auditorium “Melina Mercouri” (1st cycle: Weapons and diplomacy, 2nd cycle: Clothing and textiles). For the blind people and people with limited vision we have a leaflet in Braille script (Greek-English), a special shaped outdoor exhibition with marmor artifacts and a program of audio-haptic guided tour through the Museum’s permanent exhibition titled “Touch and be acquainted with Byzantium” in three languages (English, German, Russian) and in Greek. Moreover we provide a special brochure for the escort. All these are free of charge by the use of entrance ticket. The Museum implements various Educational Programs directed at students of kindergartens, Primary and Secondary Schools, teachers, adults, families and people with special needs. For each target group different activities are organized. Moreover there are special leaflets for the teachers, which help them to organize their own educational visits. Every year our Museum participates in all the activities of national, Europe-wide and international range. These are the “Museums’ Night”, the “International Day of Museums”, the “European Days of Cultural Heritage”, the Full Moon of August, the "Green Cultural Routes”, the Nationwide Campaign of the Association of Greek Archaeologists e.a. On that occasion the Museum produces films of a special thematic and moreover it organizes guided tours, cultural events, educational workshops, interactive exhibitions, all with free admission for the public. Alongside, we organize and accommodate, throughout the year, actions of scientific, cultural and educational character, of literature and art, such as conferences, seminars, lectures, book presentations, film screenings, music events, in which the participation for the public is free. All the events take place in indoor and outdoor areas of the Museum, in the atrium, in the reception hall and in the two auditoria (“Melina Mercouri” and “Stephanos Dragoumis”). Detailed information about exhibitions, events and educational programs you will find on the website in the fields Educational Programs and News–Events. In the Museum shop (owned by the Archaeological Receipts Fund) the visitor can buy publications related to cultural, archaeological, historical issues, books on art, books for children, replicas of archaeological objects, from the antiquity until the post-Byzantine era, modern constructions inspired by the Museum’s exhibits, clothing, jewelry, practical gifts, toys, posters and postcards e.a. The visitor can also make a pleasant break or close his tour in the café - restaurant "B" of the Museum, which is leased by the Archaeological Receipts Fund. ”
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History Museum
“A MUSEUM FOR ALL The Archaeological Museum of Thessaloniki is one of the largest museums in Greece and the central museum of northern Greece. All visitors are welcome to experience its unique collections of ancient artefacts as well as its rich and extrovert cultural activities. The Archaeological Museum of Thessaloniki is located in the centre of the city and its cultural life, only a breath away from the seafront and very close to other museums and archaeological sites. It is easily accessible via public transport.”
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History Museum
“The famous Rotonda of Thessaloniki, Macedonia: The Rotonda (or Rotunda) is one of the most important Roman monuments in Thessaloniki. It stands just next to the Arch of Galerius in the city center and it is also known as the Church of Agios Georgios. This cylindrical structure was built in 306 AD by the Roman tetrarch Galerius, who intended it to be his grave. At first, it worked as a temple but it remains unknown to which god this temple was dedicated. Eventually, Galerius died in 311 AD and he was buried in Felix Romuliana, modern Serbia. In the 4th century AD, the Byzantine emperor Constantine I converted it into an Orthodox church and many frescoes were painted inside, some of which survive today on the walls of Rotonda. In the 14th century, the Ottomans occupied Thessaloniki and in 1590, the Rotonda was converted into a mosque. In fact, a minaret was added to the building that has been restored and survives till today. In 1912, the Greeks deliberated Thessaloniki and Rotonda was converted into an Orthodox church again, till 1979, when a strong earthquake caused serious damage to the structure. Presently, the Rotonda has been restored and works as a sculpture museum. Also, it frequently hosts various exhibitions. The Rotonda has a diameter of 24,5 meters and its walls are more than 6 meters thick, which has protected the monument from time, sieges and earthquakes. This is one of the oldest Orthodox churches and has been included in the UNESCO list of the World Heritage Sites. In fact, all Paleochristian and Byzantine monuments of Thessaloniki were included in this list in 1988. ”
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Historic Site
“Totally recommended. The Bay of the Bones at the Ohrid Lake represents an attractive museum complex named Museum on Water, which includes a number of components: the reconstructed lake-dwelling, positioned on a wooden platform supported by wooden piles embedded into the lake floor; a Roman castrum, which is conserved, restored and presented at the highest plateau of the Gradishte hill; an accessible rustic stone structure with underwater show-cases as well as a rustic structure for underwater tourism. How to get there: You can go to The Bay of Bones with car, with taxi, with public transport van (tell the driver to stop at the Bay of Bones Museum - Muzej na voda), or by boat. There are round trips to St. Naum that make a break at the Museum so you can visit it too (price of the trip is 10 euros, the entrance in the museum is 2 euros).”
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Museum
“The Contemporary Art Museum is one of the largest and most complete national institutions of North Macedonia. Located in the capital city of Skopje, the museum was founded in 1963 following the disastrous earthquake that hit the city. The building project was donated by the Polish Government.”
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Museum
“Museum of the City of Skopje is a cultural institution located in Skopje, North Macedonia. Founded in 1949, it is located in a former railway station that was partly destroyed in the 1963 earthquake.”
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Museum
“Rare items & private collections The museum hosts a great number of several important and rare exhibits some of which have come from private collections. The place is a sanctuary to all the true lovers of cinema. Visitors will have the chance to see how the cinema initially started in Greece, the early first efforts of filming and producing a movie, and of course to learn more about the Golden Era of the ’60s.”
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Museum
“The Mother Teresa Memorial House is dedicated to the humanitarian and Nobel Peace Prize laureate Mother Teresa can be found in her hometown Skopje, in North Macedonia, where she lived from 1910 to 1928.”
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History Museum
“The Museum of the Macedonian Struggle for Sovereignty and Independence - Museum of VMRO - Museum of the Victims of the Communist Regime is a national museum of North Macedonia located in the capital city of Skopje.”
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Museum
“An example of a typical house in the old town of Ohrid, with traditional sculptures, furniture and examples from the gold found in Ohrid”
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Museum
“The idea of building a Jewish Museum of Greece was first conceived in the 1970’s by members of the Jewish Community of Athens, who offered every kind of assistance towards the realisation of this dream. The Museum was first established in 1977 and housed in a small room next to the city’s synagogue. It housed objects salvaged from WW II, whether artefacts, documents and manuscripts of the 19th and 20th centuries, or the jewellery of the Jews of Thrace that had been seized by the Bulgarians in 1943. The latter had been returned to the Greek government after the abdication of the Bulgarian king and the establishment of a communist regime in the country. The following years saw a thorough and careful collection of material from all the communities of Greece, under the inspired guidance of Nikos Stavroulakis, director of the Museum until 1993. The collection expanded with rare books and publications, textiles, jewellery, domestic and religious artifacts, thanks to the interest of several individuals. The Museum soon began to attract the attention of many visitors, researchers and donors. In 1981, the Association of American Friends was founded, followed, a little later, by the Association of Friends of the Jewish Museum of Greece, with members of the Jewish Communities of Athens and Thessaloniki. As the Museum’s collection grew and its activities expanded, it soon outgrew its first premises and new ones had to be found. In 1984, it moved to a rented space occupying the 3rd floor of 36, Amalias Avenue. The exhibition was reorganised into thematic units covering the interests of its various visitors. After years of efforts, the Museum acquired its legal status in 1989, as a non-profit foundation with a seven-member Board of Directors. In the following years the Museum’s activities expanded; they involved both the research and study of the Greek Jews – in collaboration with other foundations and researchers from Greece and abroad – and publishing. At the same time, its collection was being continuously enriched with new acquisitions from all over Greece, greatly exceeding all expectations. The increasing needs of the Museum for more space, together with the dream of sometime having its own premises, led to the purchase of a 19th century neoclassical building, with the support of its Friends in Greece and abroad, the Jewish Community of Thessaloniki and the Central Board of Jewish Communities in Greece. With substantial financial support from the Greek Ministry of Culture and the Associations of its Friends, the old building was renovated and, in late 1997, twenty years after it first opened its doors to the public, the Museum moved to 39 Nikis street, its new address in the centre of Athens. On March 10th, 1998, the new building of the JMG was inaugurated and a new area begun for the Museum. In the following years it developed significantly and extended all its activities, and especially the educational ones. Also, it improved its visitors services and conducted thorough research efforts, the results of which were communicated through several temporary exhibitions and special publications. Contact and communication with the public and international relations and activities of the JMG, signal an extensive social and scientific information and influence exchange. ”
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Museum
“The Holocaust Memorial Center for the Jews of Macedonia is a memorial to the holocaust of the 7,148 Jews from North Macedonia and the history of the Jews in the Balkans, located in Skopje, the capital city of North Macedonia. The Holocaust Memorial Center is a multimedia center, consisting of several functional parts.”
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History Museum
“ The Museum for the Macedonian Struggle is a historical museum. It presents the local history and cultural identity of Macedonia, keeping alive the memory of the struggles of Hellenism and highlighting the role of ordinary people who left indelible traces in a diverse cultural heritage. With the tours one discovers a lesser known but ideologically charged chapter of the Greek and Balkan history of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. After the 1978 earthquake, which caused considerable damage to the neo-classical mansion that once housed the Greek Consulate General in Thessaloniki, the building was restored and given to the "Friends of the Museum of the Macedonian Struggle" as a repository for all manner of relics and material documenting this significant chapter in Greece's modern history. The idea of the Museum, however, was not new: in April 1917, not long after Macedonia had been integrated into Greece, the Provisional Government of Premier Venizelos enacted order 2134 establishing a "Macedonian Museum", although with a much broader scope. This Museum was to assemble all the considerable archaeological finds marking the various historical and artistic periods through which Macedonia has passed, from antiquity to the end of the Ottoman era. The process of creating the museum was continued in the 1940s by the Macedonian Fraternal Association for Education, while after 1950 the initiative passed to a group of private individuals, prominent public figures and descendants of famous Makedonomachoi. In the meantime the Archaeological Museum of Thessaloniki had been founded and the establishment of another museum for the Byzantine period had been decided. This meant that what was needed was a more specialised institution, devoted exclusively to the period of the Macedonian Struggle. And so in December 1965 the Prime Minister of Greece, Stephanos Stephanopoulos signed the order providing for the founding of the Museum of the Macedonian Struggle in the building of the former Consulate General of Greece in Thessaloniki. The vision became reality when on 27 October 1982 our Museum was formally opened by the President of the Hellenic Republic, Constantine Karamanlis. The Board of Directors ”
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Museum
“amazing archaeological site, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Alexander the Great's history starts from here! ”
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History Museum
“The Museum of Macedonia was created by joining three museum in one. The three museum that were unified were the archaeological, historical and ethnological museum.”
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